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  1. National

Theresa May admits 'concern' over stop and search

The Home Secretary told the House of Commons she had "long been concerned about the use of stop and search".

Theresa May admits 'concern' over stop and search

Theresa May said: "While it is undoubtedly an important police power, when it is misused stop and search can be counter-productive

"First, it can be an enormous waste of police time. Second, when innocent people are stopped and searched for no good reason, it is hugely damaging to the relationship between the police and the public. In those circumstances it is an unacceptable affront to justice."

  1. National

Police stop and search powers to be revamped

Police will face disciplinary action if they fail to stick to a revamped code of practice for using controversial stop and search powers, the Home Secretary has told the House of Commons.

Police could face disciplinary action. Credit: John Stillwell/PA Wire/Press Association Images

Theresa May told MPs that fresh legislation on stop and search will only be introduced if forces fail to comply with the new guidance. She said officers will need to pass a rigorous new assessment of how stop and search powers are used.

If they do not pass the test they will be stripped of being able to use the powers. Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) found 27% of stop and searches examined by the watchdog did not contain reasonable grounds for suspicion.

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Former police Great Scotland Yard HQ to become hotel

The former headquarters of the Metropolitan police is to become a luxury hotel with rooms costing up to £10,000.

The building has an official address of 4 Whitehall, but with a public office for the police on Great Scotland Yard, from which it drew its name. It will now become a five star hotel with 235 rooms. The site was originally chosen Robert Peel, who was Home Secretary when the Met first formed in 1829.

Great Scotland Yard in Whitehall. Credit: Google Maps

Chief executive of the Galliad Group Stephen Conway, the firm that is redeveloping the building, told the Times (£): "These buildings were designed to impress visitors and have grand façades and high quality interiors."

It was not until 1890 that the force's home move to New Scotland Yard - recently it became the Ministry of Defence library.

Move will save around £60 million a year

The sale of the current New Scotland Yard building should save around £60 million a year Credit: Philip Toscano/PA Wire

The sell off of around a third of the Metropolitan Police's property stock includes New Scotland Yard. That should mean a saving of around £60 million a year in running costs which City Hall says will pay for an extra 1200 extra officers.

Scotland Yard's new look revealed

The design for the new Met headquarters has been revealed. The refurbished Curtis Green building on the Victoria Embankment, will become the new Metropolitan Police headquarters from 2015.

Allford Hall Monaghan Morris' winning design for London's new police HQ Credit: Allford Hall Monaghan Morris

London architect firm Allford Hall Monaghan Morris were chosen to redesign the building after the decision to sell off New Scotland Yard to save money. The new home will be known simply as Scotland Yard, but the world famous revolving sign will be relocated to the new site.

Deputy Mayor for Policing and Crime Stephen Greenhalgh said: "Scotland Yard is returning to its historical home in Whitehall. The new, smaller Met HQ will help deliver a 21st century police force and AHMM's design, which includes a public space, will help Londoners to reconnect with the Met."

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  1. National

Ex-Diana bodyguard: Murder claims 'a publicity stunt'

The former bodyguard of the Princess of Wales has called the new claims that Diana was murdered by a member of the British military a "publicity stunt".

Undated file photo of Diana, Princess of Wales. Credit: John Stillwell/PA Wire

Ken Wharfe, the Princess's former Metropolitan Police bodyguard, told The Daily Telegraph: "If these parents were so concerned that this information was relevant or had some general import, then they should have delivered it to the inquest.

"Why has it taken so long to air this new information? It seems so shallow to me. I just think it's a bit of a publicity stunt.

"For what reason I'm not certain, but in the absence of any real evidence, I'm sure this will go away."

  1. National

Report: New Diana death info alleges SAS involvement

The Sunday People reports that new information relating to Princess Diana's death emerged during the court martial of the former SAS sniper Danny Nightingale.

Sgt Danny Nightingale with his wife Sally after his court martial hearing Credit: Chris Ison/PA Wire

It is claimed that one of the pieces of evidence put before the court was a seven-page letter written by the parents in-law of another SAS operative, known only as 'Soldier N'.

The letter, which was allegedly sent to the commanding officer of the elite unit, is said to claim that Soldier N boasted that the SAS "was behind Princess Diana's death".

Danny Nightingale was found guilty of illegally possessing a gun and ammunition by a court martial board in July 2013.

  1. National

Dickie Arbiter calls Diana claims 'another red herring'

The former press secretary to the Queen, Dickie Arbiter, has described today's claims of new information on Princess Diana's death as "another red herring".

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