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Head of Finance at Surrey Police sacked for gross misconduct

The head of finance at Surrey Police has been dismissed for gross misconduct. Paul Bundy was sacked after the force found he had "mishandled internal information" and "failed to disclose a change in personal circumstances".

Surrey Police Headquarters in Guildford Credit: Press Association

In a statement, Surrey Police said: "Allegations of failure to disclose a change in personal circumstances and mishandling of internal information were found to be proven against Paul Bundy.

"He has been dismissed, subject to any appeal, with immediate effect.

"The misconduct did not relate directly to the financial responsibilities of the head of finance role and did not involve leaking to the media."


Man's body found in river at Hampton

Surrey Police has said that a man’s body has been found in the River Thames at Hampton. Officers started a search just after 6:45pm after a man was spotted entering the water near Hampton Sailing Club. The body has not yet been formally identified and enquiries are on-going to trace his family.

No cause of death in post-mortem exams

Surrey Police said the matter has now been formally passed to the coroner and an inquest will be held after finding no evidence of foul play. This was despite two post-mortem examinations carried out in November failing to establish Alexander Perepilichnyy's cause of death.

Toxicology samples were also taken from both post mortems but the results have not been released.

Supergrass's death 'not suspicious'

The death of a Russian supergrass who was a key witness in a multi-million pound international fraud investigation is not suspicious, police said today.

Alexander Perepilichnyy, 44, was found collapsed outside his home in Granville Road, Weybridge, Surrey, on November 10 last year sparking a major police investigation over fears he had been poisoned.

He was involved in a fraud case involving the theft of around £140m in tax revenue from the Russian government at the time of his death.


  1. National

Surrey Police 'should have investigated Dowler hacking'

After the IPCC concluded there was no case to answer for misconduct, Surrey Police say they have taken the following actions over the two officers being investigated:

  • In respect to the actions of Craig Denholm in 2002, the Chief Constable has taken management action and issued words of advice in relation to not assessing some of the material sent to him referring to phone-hacking.
  • In respect to the actions of Maria Woodall in 2007, the Chief Constable has taken management action and given words of advice in relation to not making the connection between the convictions for phone-hacking in 2007 and the events of 2002.

Surrey Police acknowledged in 2011 that the hacking of Milly Dowler's voicemails should have been investigated and both the former Chief Constable and I have met with and apologised to the Dowler family for the distress this has caused.

This was the largest and most high-profile murder investigation in the country at the time and remains the largest enquiry ever undertaken by Surrey Police. It was right that Milly was the primary focus of the investigation but the matter of phone-hacking should have been revisited at a later stage.

– Chief Constable Lynne Owens
  1. National

'No doubt' police knew of NOTW hacking

In the report the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) said:

"There is no doubt, from our investigation and the evidence gathered by Operation Baronet, that Surrey Police knew in 2002 of the allegation that Milly Dowler’s phone had been hacked by the News of the World (NOTW).

"It is apparent from the evidence that there was knowledge of this at all levels within the investigation team.

The report from the IPCC Credit: IPCC

"There is equally no doubt that Surrey Police did nothing to investigate it; nobody was arrested or charged in relation to the alleged interception of those messages either in 2002 or subsequently, until the Operation Weeting arrests in 2011."

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