Live updates

Asylum maze 'not deemed offensive' by previous users

We have listened to the feedback and respect the opinions of everyone who has been in touch. However, these comments are not universally representative either of many of our guests who have given us very positive feedback, or of others working within the mental health sector.

The maze is not something you happen upon when out shopping. It is set within a single closed environment and is a very small element of an event aimed at adult visitors - all of whom chose to visit, and have paid for entry to the overall event.

This maze is also in its eighth year of operation and is an obviously extreme and simulated experience which draws on classic horror film content. It is not intended, nor is it deemed to be by those who have actually experienced it, to be in any way offensive or to be a realistic portrayal of mental health or indeed any other institution.

– Thorpe Park statement

Facebook fury over Thorpe Park horror attraction

The controversial attraction has sparked a row on Thorpe Park's Facebook page, with one user posting:

I have psychosis, I'm not dangerous, and have never run after someone with a chainsaw.

Another said:

Stuff like this genuinely contributes to an atmosphere in which people with mental illness suffer discrimination and violence.

Advertisement

Thorpe Park accused of 'offensive' attraction which stigmatises mental illness

A Halloween attraction at Thorpe Park has come under fire for stigmatising mental illness. 'The Asylum horror maze' has been part of 'Fright Night' at the park in Surrey for eight years.

Mental health campaigners say having actors chase people around 'The Asylum' pretending to be patients is offensive.

Thorpe Park says the attraction is not meant to be offensive nor a realistic portrayal of mental ill health Credit: Thorpe Park

Treatment for "rollercoaster phobia"

Thorpe Park in Surrey is offering the treatment plan Credit: ITV News

A theme park has created a treatment plan for people with a fear of rollercoasters. Thorpe Park in Surrey said the move followed a spate of panic attacks and an increase in the numbers of people seen sweating and hyperventilating after going on a new ride.

The treatment plan will use a range of psychological tools and techniques that have been adapted from those used on the Virgin Atlantic ‘Flying Without Fear’ Course.

The course has helped over 25,000 people, including actress Whoopi Goldberg, socialite Jemima Khan and Coronation Street’s Antony Cotton, overcome their fear of flying.