Carl Dinnen

Political Correspondent

Carl joined ITV News in 2012 as a Political Correspondent. He has previously worked at Channel 4 News.

May plots new powers to tackle hate groups

Theresa May is proposing serious new powers to clamp down on the people and organisations who spread "hate".

Theresa May's Home Office will now fully oversee counter extremism efforts. Credit: Oli Scarff/PA Wire

There would be ASBO-style orders for hate preachers and organisations which spread extremist ideologies would be banned in the way that terrorism-linked groups can be proscribed now.

The Home Office is also going to take full control of the government's counter extremism effort now - rather than the Department for Communities and Local Government running part of it. That will include security checks to stop extremists becoming school governors or heading up charities.

But it is banning the "haters" that could prove problematic. Defining who is saying something which is so racist, sexist or homophobic that their group should be outlawed won't be straightforward.

PM's shocking situation after defection and resignation

By Carl Dinnen: ITV News Political Correspondent

Brooks Newmark has resigned as a minister for civil society but not as an MP - as far as we know - and that is over newspaper allegations, not a defection to Ukip.

Brooks Newmark

That will be cold comfort for David Cameron who is arriving in Birmingham tomorrow to a bit of a shocker of a situation just ahead of his party conference.

New anti-terror powers 'could break international law'

While the war continues in northern Iraq there is of course the concern that some jihadists will try to bring their fight to the streets of Britain.

When MPs return to the Houses of Parliament tomorrow the Prime Minister will outline tough new powers that he says the Government needs to keep Britain safe.

Those are thought to include a measure that could exclude even British nationals from returning to this country if they're thought to have been fighting in Syria.

That is something some MPs, including Liberal Democrats, say could break international law.

UK pursuing sanctions against those close to Putin

Downing Street wants to ramp up the sanctions against Russia but that's not going to happen here tonight. The groundwork for new sanctions has not yet been done.

Prime Minister David Cameron speaking to reporters after arriving at the EU summit in Brussels

The UK government wants the European Union to look at new ways of targeting individuals close to President Putin and the defence, finance and energy sectors.

These are broadly the areas where sanctions are already in place. But are they working? The Russian economy has been hit, the Rouble is at its lowest point since 1998, shares are falling.

Government sources say the Russians have been more willing to negotiate since the latest round of sanctions. But they also admit that the sanctions have yet to change the situation on the ground and that's why more are needed.