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Sussex Police officers investigated over handling of reported assault by Jimmy Savile

The IPCC is independently investigating the conduct of Sussex Police detectives over their handling of a reported indecent assault carried out by Jimmy Savile in 1970.

Notices have been served on four serving police officers to advise them they are subject to the investigation. Two of the officers, a detective sergeant and detective constable, who visited the woman over the alleged sexual offence soon after she contacted the force in March 2008, have been served with gross misconduct notices.

The two other officers, a detective chief inspector and detective inspector, who had supervisory roles, have received misconduct notices.

IPCC deputy chair, Sarah Green, who is overseeing Savile investigations, said: "The investigation is examining interactions between Sussex Police officers and the victim and whether all lines of enquiry were properly pursued.”

IPCC investigators have taken a statement from the woman who reported the assault and expect to interview the four officers soon. A number of Sussex Police policy documents are being examined.

The IPCC directed Sussex Police to refer the conduct of two of the officers late last year.

Murder investigation at care home after death of 96-year-old woman

A care home is at the centre of a murder investigation following the death of a 96-year-old woman resident.

Detectives said that they were treating the death of elderly Ethel Baldwin at the Abbey House Care Home, as suspicious. Today a 36-year-old woman was being held in the police cells after being arrested on suspicion of murder.

The investigation was launched after Ethel died at the home in Netley Abbey, Hants., on 13 September.

A post mortem examination examination was carried out on Tuesday.

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Have you ever seen a lightning picture like this?

Streaks of lighting pierce the night skies over North Wiltshire Credit: Steve Walsh

There has been heavy rainfall and dramatic thunder and lightning across the region. Steeple Ashton in Wiltshire has seen flash flooding, and a train to London was stuck in floodwater. Ninety passengers were taken off the train. Chippenham in North WIltshire experienced violent thunderstorms,.

Record numbers at Maidstone Mela

Maidstone Mela has been hailed a success by organsiers who say a record number of people attended the festival this year.

The event was held in Mote Park and is in its 12th year. It celebrates the different cultures that live in the town through music, food and dance and is one of the biggest of its kind in the South East.

Gurvinder Sandher from Kent Equality Cohesion and Richard Thick, Mayor of Maidstone, explain what the event is all about.

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We meet the cast of the new series of Downton Abbey

Back in time. It's 1924, there's a Labour Government in charge in Britain for the first time and the Charleston still reigns on the dance floor. The stage is set - Hampshire's Highclere Castle the location - and Earl and Countess of Grantham are ready to hold court. It's almost time for the new series of Downton Abbey. With Hampshire, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire providing the backdrops, we'll be reunited with those upstairs and downstairs preparing to face a new, more modern world. Amanda Piper has been to meet the cast.

City's rich history in line for top award

The Mary Rose museum is so much more than one of the most important pieces of Tudor History - it's the creation of a brand new building that's generating as much attention as the ship itself.

The unique boat shaped black structure creates a striking silhouette in Portsmouth Dockyard - and has pushed the boundaries of 21st century architecture.

As a finalist in this year's RIBA awards it's received praise from around the world - an incredible home for one of the country's greatest treasures. Stacey Poole has been to meet those behind the design.

An award for the treehouse, created in the woods of Sussex

Today we are featuring a winner of the RIBA prize - an oscar in the world of architecture and only awarded to those buildings that really stand out. It is a home in the middle of a forest, deep in the heart of Sussex. Using unusual materials and simple styling, it offers a unique place to live for a family that dared to be different. Stacey Poole has been for a look around.

Sale of Ferndown HQ approved by Dorset Police

Changes to counter service provision and the proposed sale of Ferndown divisional HQ have been announced today as a result of an extensive review of Dorset Police’s estates and contact management strategy.

The estates review was set up in 2010 aiming to examine and reshape the Force to achieve savings, and to ensure that Dorset Police continue to deliver the best service to communities by creating efficiencies and streamlining functions where possible.

The Force needs to find further savings of £9.5 million by 2015 – the result of continued reductions in central government funding, alongside inflationary cost increases.

The changes to counter services, and the decision to sell Ferndown HQ were ratified after a 12 month consultation process at the Force Strategic Change Board on Wednesday 17 September 2014. The changes will collectively save the Force an estimated £700,000.

Counter service provision is being reduced from 15 to nine locations, with four fulltime enquiry offices remaining in Bournemouth, Poole, Weymouth and Bridport.

Blandford, Gillingham and Sherborne will alternate opening two days each per week, with Swanage and Winfrith operating a ‘sign posting’ facility whereby staff help members of the public with their enquiries by directing them to relevant services.

“This decision has been one of the most challenging faced by Dorset Police in recent memory and, needless to say, it is not one that has been taken lightly. I think it is really important to remember that this time last year the Force announced the proposal to close 12 out of the 15 front office counters, and as a result of my intervention and the public intervention, the year long consultation took place which leads us to closing six. I know that six front office counters are six too many, but we have to meet our cuts somewhere when we are losing 20% of our budget. The initial review of station desk enquiry offices identified that they were an expensive and under-utilised resource, with only a small proportion of visits related to policing matters. Findings showed that in the five year period, 2009 to 2013, some offices received on average less than seven visits a day from members of the public."

– Police and Crime Commissioner Martyn Underhill

Boscombe has been closed since 2012. Verwood and Wimborne have been temporarily closed since May and June 2014 respectively and will not re-open. Shaftesbury, Ferndown, Christchurch, Winton, Dorchester and Wareham will also close as a result of Wednesday’s decision.

Recent surveys indicate that three-quarters of the public prefer to contact Dorset Police by telephone and improvements have already been made to the 101 non-emergency service.

In response to public feedback last year, the Force and PCC announced that work was underway to improve Dorset Police’s online services and that joint agency initiatives would be explored to give members of the public more choice in the ways in which they can make contact and access up to date information.

The decision to sell Ferndown divisional headquarters and transferring 220 members of staff to other areas of the Force will save almost £400,000 a year in running costs – the equivalent of 10 front line officers or 17 Community Support Officers. The estimated value of the site is approximately between £6 and £8 million.

It is expected that the sale of the building and re-location of staff could take up to two years.

The Ferndown Safer Neighbourhood Team will continue to operate in the heart of the town from their local Community Office at the Barrington Centre.

“Dorset Police is the fourth lowest spending Force in England and Wales and is faced with a very challenging budgetary situation, so difficult choices have had to be made. We know that changes of this nature are emotive, however the Force cannot continue to provide the same style of service as in the past while operating with a significantly reduced budget. We are committed to providing the best possible service while reflecting true demand and value for money and an organisational change programme continues to improve efficiency and identify savings across the Force. The initial proposal to keep just two front counters was changed following extensive consultation with the communities and partner agencies. We have listened carefully to our stakeholders and retained services where they are most needed. The Force continues to ensure that there is a policing footprint in every town in Dorset and that we continue to deliver local policing from these locations.”

– Chief Constable Debbie Simpson

Dorset Police is already relocating some of its patrolling officers to response policing hubs in east and north Dorset. These locations have been identified to best meet the current and future operational needs of the county.

The Force estate continues to be reviewed in order to meet the financial challenges and operational demands that the police face.

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