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Heathrow third runway: 5,000 new jobs, 25,000 more flights - and a congestion charge

Heathrow Airport says it will create 5,000 new jobs over the next five years if it gets approval for a third runway. It also plans a controversial congestion charge and a ban on night flights before 0530.

The airport revealed radical expansion plans today ahead of a possible third runway that could open in 2025. The plans will be subject to consultation and Government approval.

It will also spent tens of millions of pounds on insulation and other measures to help reduce nose for residents.

Heathrow wants a third runway Credit: ITV News

Overall flight numbers will rise by 25,000 a year with four million more passengers. The airport says new technology will allow this without causing more delays for existing flights.

The airport says the measures will help keep Britain competitive after Brexit with new links from airports in the UK and around the world and it will help boost the economy.

The measures are dependant on a third runway being approved. Gatwick, meanwhile, wants its plans approved - for a second runway - rather than Heathrow.

Heathrow's flight path passes over homes in Berkshire Credit: PA Images

While the restriction on night flights will be welcome the 25,000 extra flights a year will be seen as extra noise and misery for hundreds of thousands under the flight paths by critics.

Here are the main points from the proposals to be implemented by 2021 ahead of a third runway being approved. Full details will be revealed at the Tory conference on Monday.

  • Estimated 5,000 new jobs.
  • £1.5 billion pound boost to the economy after Brexit.
  • 25,000 extra flights a year. New technology and better use of existing runways will achieve this.
  • Four million extra passengers a year.
  • Congestion charge considered. This could be a new drop-off charge, increased car parking charges or a scheme similar to congestion charging in London. This is to help reduce emissions, fund new public transport initiatives and ensure fifty per cent of passengers arrive by public transport by 2030.
  • No night flights before 0530 which is an hour later than at present
  • £60 million spent on noise insulation for homes under the flight path
  • New monitoring equipment to ensure noise levels are not broken.
  • Better facilities for cyclists, electric cars and green transport.

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John Lewis partnership posts profits warning

The group also owns Bracknell-based Waitrose Credit: PA

John Lewis Partnership has posted a 14.7% fall in half-year pre-tax profits to £81.9 million, citing "deep structural changes in the retail market".

After exceptional items, including a £25 million write-down on property assets that it no longer intends to develop, pre-tax profits in the period plunged 75% to £56.9 million.

The group, which also owns Bracknell-based Waitrose, said its commitment to competitive pricing, increasing pay and investment held back profits in the six months to July 30.

Chairman Sir Charlie Mayfield said the results were not linked to the EU referendum result.

He said: "We have grown gross sales and market share across both Waitrose and John Lewis, but our profits are down. This reflects market conditions and, in particular, steps we are taking to adapt the partnership for the future."

Apologies and promises from i360 chairman as tourist attraction re-opens

The designer of the south coast's newest and tallest visitor attraction said the i360 was back in business today - and promised no repetition of what he called 'the teething troubles' of the past week.

David Marks admitted the problems, which saw hundreds of people trapped in the observation tower, were unfortunate and apologised to customers whose trips had to be cancelled. Andy Dickenson reports.

Sussex inventor's tiny revolution 'could save rock stars' ears'

They're a small firm from Sussex that make stadium-filling speakers used by rock legends like Jimmy Page and Jarvis Cocker.

But their latest innovations aren't giant devices designed to destroy your ears - but tiny ones to protect them.

Confused?

Andy Dickenson explains with the help of Flare inventor Davies Roberts, Roscomac managing director Joseph Martello, and founding member of the Art of Noise, Gary Langan.

Tourism in Brighton 'never stronger' as Brexit pound increases staycations

Are you one of the five million Brits who have been holidaying 'at home' this weekend?

Experts say that with the falling value of the pound, following the EU referendum, more of us than ever are taking our vacations in the UK. And with the sun shining, that's led to a bumper Bank Holiday in Brighton.

Andy Dickenson reports, speaking to Max Leviston, general manager of the Sealife Centre, and Amy Gray of Visit Britain.

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'There was no management for my Mum' - Sussex NHS Trust goes into special measures

An NHS Trust that runs both the Royal Sussex County Hospital in Brighton and the Princess Royal in Haywards Heath has been placed in 'special measures'.

A new Care Quality Commission report describes a catalogue of errors - including patients treated in corridors, a lack of leadership, poor safety, and long waiting times.

The damning indictment even included allegations of bullying and discrimination between staff.

Andy Dickenson reports and speaks to Maggie Snowsell, Alan Thorne of the Care Quality Commission, and Dr Stephen Holmberg of Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust.

Dorset bus drivers are due to strike on Monday

Emergency timetables are in place Credit: ITV

More than 100 bus drivers in Dorset are due to go on strike on Monday in a row over pay. Drivers working for First Dorset in Weymouth and Bridport are starting their eighth week of action. Emergency timetables have been put in place for services, and the company says it will minimise disruption for passengers.

Sussex brewery announces expansion plans

Harvey's staff at the festival Credit: Harvey's

Iconic East Sussex brewery Harvey's is re-branding its beer range. The new look was officially unveiled at the trade session of the Great British Beer Festival.

The re-brand also includes plans to formally expand the brewery's sales area throughout the UK. Historically it has only sold beer to customers within a 60-mile radius of the brewery, but the British beer boom has prompted it to offer beer further afield.

"We've got two centuries of expertise in brewing and we're well known by our loyal customers and discerning drinkers for being the original Sussex brewer - making the finest quality beers," said Harvey's Brewery spokesman Bob Trimm.

"But we've also got plenty to offer a new generation of drinkers and we think our new visual branding will make it easier for them - and those who already love our beers - to find us on the bar."

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