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Descendants of a deserter fight to honour his memory

As the centenary of the start of the First World War approaches, a family from Kent is hoping that the name of a relative will finally be engraved onto a memorial in Shoreham. Private Thomas Highgate was shot for desertion in 1914 but has since been pardoned.

His family say there's no reason why he should not now be remembered. Our reporter David Johns spoke to Thomas Highgate's nephew Terence.

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Primary places - the situation in the South East

by Sarah Saunders (@SSaundersITV)

Today marked the first time that every primary school across the UK decided on their intake on the same day.

Although most youngsters ended up exactly where their parents wanted them to go, it meant that thousands in the south east missed out on their top choice. And well over a thousand children did not get any _of the schools they wanted.

As Sarah Saunders reports, the real problem was too few schools and too many children.

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Thousands miss out on primary school place

File photo showing primary school pupils during a lesson. Credit: Barry Batchelor/PA Wire

Around one in seven children have missed out on their parents' first choice of primary school amid a continuing squeeze on places.

Hundreds of thousands of families across the country have been learning which school their child will be attending from this September, in the first ever primary National Offer Day

Early figures indicate that a child's chances of getting their top choice depend heavily on where they live, with almost all getting their first preference in some places, and more than a third missing out in others.

File photo of a primary school pupil at work in a classroom. Credit: PA

A survey conducted by the Press Association, based on responses from more than 50 councils, found that nationally, 86.99% of four-year-olds have won a place at their first preference school this year.

But this means that 13.01% - almost one in seven youngsters - have missed out.

Watch: Primary school places: How to appeal a decision

Almost 90% secure first choice schools in Hampshire

Almost 90% of parents have been allocated a place at their first place school across Hampshire.

More than 97% have been offered a place at one of their top three schools, according to Hampshire County Council.

In total, Hampshire County Council’s Admissions Service has processed almost 15,000 applications for primary school places.

The news comes after the council agreed a new budget that included investment of £150 million to expand and build new schools, creating thousands of school places to meet forecast demand.

I am pleased to see that we have been able, yet again, to offer a high number of pupils a place at their preferred school. I do understand that there will be some disappointment for a small number of parents who did not secure a place for their child at a school of their choice.

I am pleased to see that we have been able, yet again, to offer a high number of pupils a place at their preferred school. I do understand that there will be some disappointment for a small number of parents who did not secure a place for their child at a school of their choice."

– Councillor Keith Mans, Executive Lead Member for Children’s Services,

Record number offered top primary place in Reading

More families than ever have been offered their first choice of primary school in Reading.

A total of 1,673 families were offered their first choice place for primary schools, but an increase in applications means the allocations is slightly down from last year.

There has been an on-going and significant increase in the population of primary school children in Reading since 2012 and every family who applied has been offered a place.

The Council is meeting this increased demand with a £64 million investment in 13 primary schools across Reading.

The first new places are available from this September, along with some one-off additional classes and the new Heights Primary School in Caversham.

It has once again been a challenging year to cater for the continuing increased demand for school places in Reading. The increase in applications this year was widely predicted and justifies the significant investment the Council is making in expanding primary schools across Reading. This is the first year where some of those permanent expansions have fed directly into the primary school application process and it is reassuring that the investment programme is beginning to have a positive effect."

– Kevin McDaniel, Head of Education
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