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Ebola screening at Gatwick

Gatwick airport Credit: P.A.

Screening for Ebola at Gatwick Airport will begin, say Public Health Enland.

It will start in North Terminal, then checks will begin at South Terminal,

followed by St Pancras (Eurostar) later this week, a spokesman said.

He added: "This expands the screening initiated at Heathrow last week, which

is going well. Manchester and Birmingham airports will follow in the coming

weeks.

"Screening is being undertaken to help ensure individuals arriving from

high-risk areas know what to do if they start feeling ill, and can receive

expert advice immediately. We are also providing all general practices,

emergency departments, and pharmacies in England with awareness posters from

this week. Public Health England will continue to consider other appropriate

additional measures."

The screening is taking place for passengers that Border Force officers

identify as having travelled from Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia.<

Passengers have their temperature taken and complete a questionnaire asking

about their current health, recent travel history and whether they might be at

potential risk through contact with Ebola patients.<

Based on the information provided and their temperature, passengers will either

be given advice and allowed to continue their journey, or undergo a clinical

assessment by PHE staff and if necessary be transferred to hospital for further

tests.

"Screening is being undertaken to help ensure individuals arriving from high-risk areas know what to do if they start feeling ill, and can receive expert advice immediately. We are also providing all general practices, emergency departments, and pharmacies in England with awareness posters from this week. Public Health England will continue to consider other appropriate additional measures."

– Public Health England
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Oxfam: Troops needed to tackle spread of Ebola

UK charity Oxfam has called for 'more troops, funding and medical staff' to tackle Ebola. Credit: Anna Gowthorpe/PA Wire/Press Association Images

More troops, funding and medical staff are urgently needed to prevent the Ebola outbreak becoming the "definitive humanitarian disaster of our generation", Oxfam has warned.

The UK-based charity said there was less than a two-month window to curb the spread of the deadly virus but there remained a "crippling shortfall" in military personnel to provide logistical support across west Africa.

The charity said it was "extremely rare" to call for military intervention but troops were "desperately needed" to build treatment centres, provide flights and offer engineering and logistical support.

Oxfam also called for European Union foreign ministers meeting in Brussels on Monday to follow the UK's lead in pledging £125m in response to the Ebola crisis.

We are in the eye of a storm. We cannot allow Ebola to immobilise us in fear, but instead we must move toward a common mission to stop it from getting worse...Countries that have failed to commit troops, doctors and enough funding are in danger of costing lives.

– Oxfam's chief executive Mark Goldring

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Southampton FC vs bladder and kidney cancer

Southampton stars Jay Rodriguez and Sammy Saint

Southampton FC have put their support behind a campaign, which is helping to raise awareness of a key symptom of bladder or kidney cancer – blood in pee.

Thermochromic posters have been installed in all of the urinals at St. Mary's stadium, ahead of the game against Sunderland on Saturday. When 'used', the heat reactive posters change colour and reveal the campaign message ‘if you notice blood in your pee, even if it’s ‘just the once’ tell your doctor’.

It comes as part of Public Health England's 'Be Clear on Cancer' campaign. More than 9 in 10 people in England survive bladder or kidney cancer for at least a year if diagnosed at the earliest stage.

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Royal College of Surgeons monitor cancer scandal trust

The Royal College of Surgeons has said it is continuing to monitor Surrey & Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust following revelations that one of the trust's doctors may have been mistreated cancer patients.

The RCS reviewed the care of patients who had been treated for prostate and bladder cancer at East Surrey Hospital in April 2014 after consultant urologist Paul Miller was suspended.

A RCS spokeswoman said: "At the end of our visit we provided immediate feedback that confirmed serious patient safety concerns for the trust's medical director to address and that the surgeon should remain excluded from practice while the trust's investigations continued."

Solicitor reacts to claims against hospital consultant

Clinical negligence solicitor Christian Beadell, from law firm Slater & Gordon, which is representing a number of patients, said: "While it is good to see that Surrey and Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust is taking positive steps to notify patients, I would have some concern that Mr Miller was first suspended in December and it has taken 10 months to make these concerns more widely known.

"During that time, some patients may have suffered a worsening of their condition."

Cancer row doctor speaks out over dismissal

Paul Miller, the consultant in the East Surrey Hospital cancer row, has spoken out over the claims against him.

He said: “I am extremely disappointed that the trust has decided to dismiss me.

"I strongly do not believe that this is justified. I welcome the opportunity to co-operate with any investigation into my practice.

"My priority as a consultant for the last 21 years has always been to protect patients’ best interests and safety.

"I cannot comment further due to my duty of patient confidentiality.”

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Hospital apology over care of cancer patients

More than 1,000 cancer patients have been contacted by a hospital trust over concerns they may have been mistreated.

Surrey and Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust said letters had been sent to 1,200 prostate and bladder cancer patients after a review found 27 people were harmed following treatment by a consultant urologist between 2006 and 2013.

Paul Miller was suspended in December last year and no longer works at the trust.

The General Medical Council (GMC) confirmed he is currently unable to treat urological cancer patients pending an investigation.

In a statement, the trust - who have not publicly named Mr Miller - said a panel of experts found 27 patients "came to harm because of the treatment they received under the former trust urologist's care", including five who have since died.

A further "small number of patients" were also given treatment below hospital standards - but the panel found they were not harmed as a consequence, it added.

There were no concerns about the care received by the remaining patients, the NHS trust said.

Des Holden, the trust's medical director, said: "On behalf of the trust, I apologise unreservedly for the errors in these patients' treatment.

"I acknowledge and appreciate that the outcome of the clinical review and the content of the letters will be deeply distressing to our patients and their families and I am very sorry."

Mr Holden told BBC Surrey Radio that the NHS trust was alerted after concerns were raised by a doctor and a group of nurses and it had been an "upsetting experience" for both patients and staff.

He said: "There have been five deaths in the 27 patients. It wouldn't be correct to say they died as a consequence of the progression of their disease.

"This is a cancer that predominantly affects very elderly people.

"It's a factor, but it wouldn't be correct to say they died as a consequence of the mismanagement."

The Royal College of Surgeons was invited into the NHS trust to conduct the clinical review.

Mr Miller also worked at Spire Gatwick Park Hospital in Horley, Surrey.

Its director, John Crisp, said: "Spire suspended Mr Miller in December 2013 as soon as the trust notified us of their investigation into Mr Miller and he has not undertaken any surgery or held clinics at our hospital since.

"We are sorry for any distress this may be causing our patients."

Surrey and Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust has set up a hotline for patients and their families to talk with a consultant or specialist nurse about their concerns of aspects of their care.

The lines are open Monday to Friday, between 11am-7pm, and the number is 0808 168 7754.

Learn how to save a life - hospital gives free CPR lessons

Credit: Photo: PA

Queen Alexandra Hospital in Portsmouth is one of a number of hospitals giving lifesaving CPR lessons as part of Restart a Heart Day.

It's aimed at teaching members of the public how to help restart the heart of someone who has suffered a cardiac arrest. BMJ say that 60,000 people a heart attack at home every year. The charity believes mandatory CPR skills and awareness campaigns could help save over a quarter of cardiac arrest sufferers every year.

Here are some statistics that show how important CPR can be:

  • Survival rates are 12% overall - at best
  • For every minute that passes without CPR, survival decreases by 10%
  • 22,000 die every year - with shocked relatives unable to give CPR
  • Compulsory CPR lessons in schools could save 5,000 lives every year
  • BHF survey: 40% of people lack the knowledge and skills to act

Hospital trust contacts 1,200 cancer patients over fears they were mistreated

East Surrey Hospital

More than 1,200 cancer patients at a Surrey hospital are being written to over fears they may have been mistreated.

Surrey and Sussex Healthcare NHS trust is contacting patients treated at East Surrey Hospital in Redhill.

Based upon each patient’s clinical history, an external panel of consultant urologists found that 27 patients came to harm because of the treatment they received under the former Trust Urologist’s care.

In addition, the care of a small number of patients fell below the standards expected, however these same experts felt they have not been harmed as

In total, 1,200 bladder and prostate cancer patients may have been treated wrongly.

It's believed 27 bladder and prostate cancer patients came to harm because of the treatment they received.

An external panel of Urologists conducted the review of 1,200 people treated between 2006 and 2013.

Following suspension and an internal investigation, the Consultant Urologist is no longer employed at the Trust.

Des Holden, the Trust’s Medical Director, said “On behalf of the Trust, I apologise unreservedly for the errors in these patients’ treatment.

"I acknowledge and appreciate that the outcome of the clinical review and the content of the letters will be deeply distressing to our patients and their families and I am very sorry.

"I would encourage patients and their families to telephone the helpline if it would be of benefit.”

A helpline has been established for concerned patients and their next of kin 0808 168 7754.

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