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Campaigners call on the Prime Minister to continue funding cancer drugs

Credit: ITV news

Oxfordshire campaigner Clive Stone is calling on the Prime Minister to keep his promise to cancer patients by halting the removal of 25 drugs from the Cancer Drugs Fund. Mr Stone from Eynsham, was awarded an MBE in 2011 for campaigning on behalf of cancer sufferers.

The Government announced that the medication will be withdrawn on the grounds of cost and effectiveness. Mr Stone, who has battled cancer himself, is backing a petition calling for the decision to be reversed.

The petition at you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/keepyourpromise claims 8,000 patients face vital treatments being taken away. It has already been signed by more than 4,000 people.

The Government says it's injecting more cash into the fund and that any patient currently receiving a drug through the CDF would continue to receive it. Some patients may instead receive an alternative CDF-approved drug.

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Trapped in her armchair - the woman unable to move for over a year

Sally Walker hasn't left her house for three years Credit: ITV

A disabled woman who's spent the last year trapped in her armchair has been speaking to Meridian about her living nightmare.

Sally Walker from Hampshire has a chronic disability called lymphedema, a swelling of the legs that's left her in pain and unable to move.

She's backing a campaign for more disabled-friendly homes, for the five million people in Britain who have mobility problems.

The Leonard Cheshire Disability Charity believes unsuitable and dangerous housing causes problems like depression and accidents, which end up costing the tax payer much more than if the homes were better designed in the first place.

Sally is backing the Leonard Cheshire Disability charity's "Home Truth" campaign Credit: ITV Meridian

Scientists awarded £6m Parkinson's Disease research

Around 127,000 people in Britain are afflicted by the incurable condition of Parkinson's Disease. On average it strikes 1 person in every 500, and can leave people struggling to walk, sleep or speak.

Now, researchers at the University of Oxford have been awarded a grant of six million pounds. The scientists at the Oxford Parkinson’s Disease Centre will use the money to find new drugs which will slow or even stop the progress of Parkinson's.

As Nia Mason reports Oxford is leading research into a disease which has ten million sufferers across the world.

If you or someone you know has been affected by Parkinson's Disease you can find out more from Parkinson's UK research.

find out more about Parkinson’s UK research atparkinsons.org.uk/research and find out more about the Oxford Parkinson’s Disease Centre at opdc.ox.ac.uk

  1. Tom Savvides

Cystic Fibrosis patient receives stem cell treatment

A young woman from Kent has become the first British Cystic Fibrosis patient to receive stem-cell treatment and she believes it will make a difference to her life. Roisin Kelleher O'Callaghan from Faversham flew to the Dominican Republic to have the procedure, which cost £35,000. The money was raised by family, friends and wellwishers. Now she's campaigning for the treatment to be available on the NHS. But Cystic Fibrosis experts here say it's untested and carries its own risks. Tom Savvides talks to Roisin and her mother Anntoinette Kelleher.

Mother-of-two in Mexico after massive fundraising effort for cancer treatment

Samantha Beavan has gone to Mexico for specialist treatment Credit: Wendy Campling

A young mother with cancer is being given pioneering treatment in Mexico after a mass fundraising campaign by her friends.

Samantha Beavan, 28, from Brighton, has cervical cancer which has spread to her lungs and brain.

Samantha Beavan with her daughter Credit: ITV Meridian

Her friend Wendy Campling said: "Although it's gruelling and Sam is still poorly she is making progress and we believe this treatment will be successful - it's been hugely successful for other cancer patients.

"We still have a long way to go with our fundraising.

"We appreciate everything that everyone has been doing and as her friend if I could come and cuddle you all and say thank you I would.

"So many of you have touched our hearts (had me in tears with some) and I know Sam is so grateful."

For more information about their fundraising campaign click here.

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  1. Tom Savvides

Paralysed man threatened with eviction from his home

A decision by council officials to evict a paralysed man from accommodation where he relies on round-the-clock care is being described as disgraceful and inhumane. Simon Gray, who broke his neck two years ago, says he's being forced to move to save money and it will rob him of a vital support network. The 42 year old graphic designer from Burgess Hill is taking his fight to the local government ombudsman. Tom Savvides talks to Simon Gray and councillor Pru Moore.

Surrey patients challenge Hospice misconceptions

In a new video launched by a Surrey hospice, patients have spoken out to challenge people’s misconceptions of what a Hospice is really like.

Phyllis Tuckwell Hospice, along with local video production professional Jack Taylor, has released a new video - where they discuss experiences of living in a hospice.

Local video producer Jack Taylor had the same misconceptions, but, after having a look around the Hospice and meeting its staff and patients, he soon changed his mind.

“Visiting the Hospice blew me away,” he confessed. “It was an eye-opening experience. Your team are amazing.”

More help needed for eating disorder victims

New figures show eating disorders are costing the UK economy around 15 billion pounds each year. To mark Eating Disorders Awareness week, the charity Beat has released the findings of a report looking at the financial effects of the issue.

It also found that many people are waiting too long for treatment when early intervention can make all the difference when it comes to recovery. Victoria Lampard reports

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