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Fixers want more coverage of disabled sports

A young disabled athlete from Southend-on-Sea is campaigning for year-round media coverage of disabled sports - because he's fed up with the current peaks and troughs around events like the Paralympics.

James Ireland wants disabled sports to be taken more seriously. He's enlisted the help of Fixers, the campaign that gives young people a voice, to make his point.

Find out more about FIxershere.

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X-Factor winner surprises young cancer survivor

Credit: Cancer Research UK

X-Factor winner Matt Terry surprised a young Oxford cancer survivor by joining him to busk at a busy train station ahead of World Cancer Day.

Matt took time out of his busy schedule rehearsing for the X-Factor live tour to join 12-year-old aspiring musician Ace Manthey and his fourteen-year-old sister Sky as they performed before the crowds.

Singer Matt was playing his part in a surprise #ActOfUnity to encourage the nation to wear a Cancer Research UK Unity Band and donate for World Cancer Day on Saturday 4th February.

Ace and Sky are regular buskers in Oxford city centre and were excited about performing in London’s Kings Cross station for what they thought was a promotional video for Cancer Research UK.

But they were delighted when Matt sneaked up beside them and joined in their rendition of Avicii’s number one single, Wake Me Up. Afterwards, Matt treated Ace and Sky to breakfast where he found out more about Ace’s cancer diagnosis and shared some advice on how to crack the music industry.

When Ace was three, he had been play fighting with Sky when a huge bruise appeared on his chest. His GP sent him for a blood test where he was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Ace spent years going through chemotherapy and steroid treatment and it was during this time he learned to play the guitar. Now he has set his sights on becoming the next big rock star.

Hospital is 'committed to making improvements'

When healthcare inspectors turned up unannounced at Portsmouth's Queen Alexandra Hospital last February they were alarmed by what they found.

They rated the A&E department as 'inadequate' because patients 'may have been exposed to the risk of harm'.

Almost a year on, it's been moved from inadequate to 'requires improvement'. It seems things are moving in the right direction. But is it good enough?

Our presenter, Fred Dinenage, spoke to the hospital's Chief Executive, Tim Powell, to find out:

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One year in - inside the 19th century hospital at centre of half a billion pound redesign

The Royal Sussex County Hospital in Brighton contains some of the oldest buildings in the NHS, dating back almost two hundred years.

It is now the centre of one of the most expensive redesigns in the country - costing nearly half a billion pounds. But while eight years of work goes on patients have to be looked after as normal.

So, with the first twelve months completed, Andy Dickenson went to see how doctors, nurses and patients were getting on. He speaks to clinical director Peter Larsen-Disney, patient Geoffrey Price and ward manager Zingy Thetho.

University of Oxford to develop diabetes research

Credit: ITV Meridian

The University of Oxford is to collaborate with a global healthcare company to develop its research into type 2 diabetes.

The joint venture with Novo Nordisk will focus on treatments for the condition.

The company will invest over £1 million over 10 years building a new research centre at the site which will employ 100 people.

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