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Inventor uses implanted microchip to start car

The Hampshire inventor has implanted the microchip in his hand Credit: ITV Meridian

An inventor from Hampshire has created a tiny microchip inserted into his hand, that's only the size of a grain of rice, to start his car and open his office door.

Steven Northam just waves his hand over a sensor to operate daily tasks and is now offering the service to others for the first time.

As Chloe Oliver reports.

Chloe spoke to Steven Northam, entrepreneur and inventor and Dr Geoff Watson, Anesthetic Consultant.

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Rare pre-historic rhino tooth found on Isle of Wight

A teenage fossil hunter has discovered the tooth from a rare prehistoric rhinoceros that roamed the Isle of Wight 35-40 million years ago.

The tooth of the rhino-like Ronzotherium washed up on the beach on the coast near Yarmouth, in the north west of the island after being entombed in clay for million of years.

Theo Vickers, 18,was out fossil hunting when he came across the Rhino molar and knew straight away that he'd found something very special.

Ronzotherium tooth washed up on Isle of Wight Credit: Dinosaur Isle Museum

I knew straight away it was a species of rhinoceros, and after researching it further online I contacted Dinosaur Isle Museum. Finds of primitive rhinos like Ronzotherium are really rare.

It’s strange to think that such an iconic animal that people would usually associate with the African savannah, was actually evolving here, on the Isle of Wight, 35 million years ago.

– Theo Vickers

The clays where the fossil was found were laid down in a sub-tropical swampy floodplain similar to the Florida Everglades that covered the area which is now the Solent.

There have only been a handful of these teeth found in the UK and and they are all at the Natural history Museum and date from the 19th century.

This is the first one that has been found in may years and the first in our collection which dates from 1820.

It dates from the Oligiocene period when the world was changing dramatically and the Northern hemisphere was cooling.

There was extensive swamp over the area we now know as the Solent, and at this point in our history the UK was connected to mainland Europe. Other teeth and bones have been found in France.

The tooth had only been out of the clays for a few days it was washed out of eroded clay but is still very shiny. I think it is important the tooth stays on the Island and it will be looked at by a specialist and hopefully will add to our knowledge.

– Dinosaur Isle Museum curator, Dr Martin Munt

Beekeepers try to take the sting out of falling numbers of vital wildlife

Few creatures are more vital to our survival than bees - pollinating the world's fruit and vegetable crops.

Yet in recent years their numbers have fallen alarmingly which makes a traditional market that takes place every year in Sussex all the more important.

Andy Dickenson reports and speaks to beekeepers Jonathan Cootae and Brian Hopper, as well as president of Sussex Beekeepers Association, Amanda Millar.

All aboard the nation's first 'solar powered buses'

It's a first not just for Brighton, but for the country. Two electric buses - powered by solar energy - have arrived in the city and are about to pick up passengers day and night.

They're completely carbon neutral and they hope to lead the charge in a revolution in sustainable transport.

Andy Dickenson reports and speaks to Norman Baker, Tom Druitt and Julia Fry.

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Boaty McBoatface to dive into the abyss on first Antarctic mission

Credit: University of Southampton

Boaty McBoatface is to join ocean scientists on an expedition to study some of the deepest and coldest abyssal ocean waters on earth – known as Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) – and how they affect climate change.

Boaty McBoatface is an unmanned submersible, developed by the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) in Southampton. It was given the name following last year’s campaign to name the UK’s new polar research ship. Although the Boaty McBoatface was the popular winner of the naming contest, the ship will instead be named after famous naturalist and broadcaster Sir David Attenborough.

The submersible is now embarking on its first Antarctic research mission.

The team of researchers from the University of Southampton and British Antarctic Survey (BAS) will assess water flow and underwater turbulence in the Orkney Passage, a region of the Southern Ocean around 3,500m deep and roughly 500 miles from the Antarctic Peninsula.

Professor Alberto Naveira Garabato is the the lead scientist of the research cruise Credit: University of Southampton

Our goal is to learn enough about these convoluted processes to represent them (for the first time) in the models that scientists use to predict how our climate will evolve over the 21st century and beyond.”

– Professor Alberto Naveira Garabato, lead scientist, University of Southampton
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