Cameron's cancer cash pledge

Medics in Oxford have backed David Cameron's £400m cancer package to boost research and treatment for cancer patients. The Cancer Drugs Fund was set up in 2011 to help patients access certain drugs before they get approval for widespread NHS use.

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Prime Minister extends cancer drug programe

Prime Minister David Cameron visited cancer patients in Oxford today after extending a cash pot used to pay for life-extending drugs. The Cancer Drugs Fund, worth £200m a year, was set up for patients to access drugs approved by doctors but not been given the go-ahead for widespread use on the NHS.

The scheme was set to run until 2014. Mr Cameron spoke to reporters at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford and explained why the funding programme will run for an extra two years.

Camerons meet patients at Oxford cancer ward

Prime Minister David Cameron (L) and his wife Samantha talk to Chase Howie at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford Credit: Press Association Images

Prime Minister David Cameron and his wife Samantha met patients at an Oxford cancer ward on the same day he announced a £400m cancer drug fund. Mr Cameron pledged to extend the Cancer Drugs Fund which was set up to help patients access certain drugs before they get approval for widespread NHS use

The Camerons earlier visited the children's cancer ward at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford to make the announcement.

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Oxford medics back Cameron's cancer cash pledge

David Cameron has extended the Cancer Drugs Fund until 2016 Credit: Press Association Images

Doctors in Oxford have praised the Prime Minister for extending a cancer drugs programme. The Cancer Drugs Fund was set up in 2011 to help patients access certain drugs before they get approval for widespread NHS use. The scheme was due to end next year.

But Prime Minister David Cameron has pledged £400m to keep it running. Dr Andrew Protheroe, Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Churchill Hospital in Oxford, said: 'The more treatment options that are available to me, the better job I feel I can do for my patients.

'Before the Cancer Drugs Fund, doctors were not able to use a whole range of drugs which were part of standard practice in other countries. This fantastic announcement means we won’t have to go back to those days.'

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