The Great Storm 1987 - your memories

Thirty years ago, on 16th October 1987, the worst storm for three centuries lashed the South, leaving a trail of destruction in its wake. 18 people were killed in the storm, 15 million trees were felled, and winds of up to 115 mph were recorded. The cost of the damage was put at more than £1.4 billion pounds.

The storm wasn't expected to come as far as Britain - it formed in the bay of Biscay - and forecasters didn't think it would get past the Channel but gales hit North West Brittany at 11pm that night and Dorset and Hampshire at midnight - by 3am the storm was in London and the South east.

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Recovering from the Great Storm in Kent and Sussex

Nothing has compared since. The Great Storm of 1987 claimed lives and destoyed homes.

More than 15 million trees were uprooted - many of them in areas of ancient woodland.

The massive clear-up lasted several years - and it's taken even longer - to restore large areas of forest. Work that's still going on today in places such as Emmetts Garden in Kent and Wakehurst in Sussex, run by the National Trust.

We speak to: Gardener Alan Comb and Head Gardener Matthew Scott from Emmetts. And Wakehurst Conservation and Woodland manager Ian Parkinson and Clare Trevidi from Kew Science Directorate.

Recovering from the Great Storm at Wakehurst

30 years ago today we saw the worst storm in living memory - in the UK - the most devastating in 300 years.

The storm stetched across the South East coast - striking at midnight and lasting several hours. In the process millions of trees were uprooted.

The massive clear-up lasted several years - and it's taken even longer - to restore large areas of forest. Work that's still going on today at places like Wakehurst in Sussex.

We speak to Conservation and Woodland manager Ian Parkinson and Clare Trevidi from the Kent Science Directorate.

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The Great Storm 1987: We hear your stories

Do you remember where you were on 16 October 1987? Well, few who lived through it will ever forget it. Thirty years ago, the worst storm for three hundred years lashed the South, leaving a trail of destruction in its wake.

18 people were killed in the storm, 15 million trees were felled, and winds of up to 115 mph were recorded.

The cost of the damage was put at more than £1.4 billion.

The storm wasn't expected to come as far as Britain - it formed in the bay of Biscay. Forecasters didn't think it would get past the channel but gales hit North West Brittany at 11pm that night and Dorset and Hampshire at midnight - by three in the morning the storm was devastating the South east.

John Ryall has been speaking to people who experienced the storm first-hand

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