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Hastings' winning artwork

A 3D image of what the winning sculpture will look like Credit: Hastings Borough Council

Hastings seafront will display the winning sculpture of a commission by the local council and Fairlight Arts Trust.

'Helter Skelter' by Henry Krokatsis is a thirteen metre structure of a traditional helter skelter and lighthouse.

The inspiration for the artwork includes the history of Hastings as a former 'Cinque Port' as well as the seafront's fairground tradition.

Artist Henry Krokatsis said: "I want to make a work that draws on its surroundings - the net huts, the tradition of pier entertainments, Hastings' former role as a harbour and the makeshift constructions originally built on the nearby America Ground."

Winning sculpture at Hastings

A leading British artist has won the commission to display his new artwork at Hastings seafront.

Fairlight Arts Trust announced Henry Krokatsis as the winner with his 'Helter Skelter' design, ahead of Brazilian artist de Cemin's 'Standing Wave'.

The winner was chosen by a select panel and was the preferred choice of the public after consultations in March.

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Council urged to sell artwork to avoid making cuts

A cash-strapped council has been criticised for refusing to sell its valuable artwork - despite propsoing cuts to services of more than £100,000,000 over the next five years.

Brighton and Hove Council is sitting on a £32m pound art collection - most of it stored away from public view. Now there are calls for them to sell up - to ease the burden on tax payers as Charlotte Wilkins reports.

Should councils keep so much art in storage?

A cash-strapped council has come under fire for refusing to sell its valuable artwork - despite propsoing cuts to services of more than £100,000,000 over the next five years. Brighton and Hove Council is sitting on a £32m art collection - most of it stored away from public view.

Now there are calls for them to sell up. Earlier, Fred spoke with Professor Martin Hammer, an expert on the History and Philosophy of Art from the University of Kent and asked him if it's right that councils are keeping so much art in storage?