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Large & prestigious medieval tournament in Sussex

It's one of the most prestigious medieval tournaments in the worlds and the largest of its kind in Europe. Thousands of spectators will watch jousting and knights in hand-to-hand combat at Arundel Castle in Sussex this week.

Andy Dickenson took a look behind the scenes and spoke to Andreas Wenzel, a knight marshal, knights Phillip Leitch and Ben van Koert and rider Kyle van Dolah.

MP raises concern about new flight paths from Gatwick Airport

Gatwick Airport Credit: ITV news

Arundel & South Downs MP Nick Herbert has raised concerns about aircraft noise over Downland villages resulting from a trial flight path from Gatwick. The MP has received numerous complaints from residents who say that it results in lower flying aircraft and noise over their villages.

The flight path trials are part of a consultation about London airspace by the Civil Aviation Authority.

In a reply Stuart Wingate, Chief Executive of Gatwick Airport, said that the trial would run until 17 August, after which the flight paths would revert to their previous route and he apologised for any disturbances caused during the trial.

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Wildlife reserve assesses impact of flooding on its birds

A wildlife reserve in Sussex has revealed the impact the recent flooding has had on the animals in its care.

Much of site belonging to the charity 'The Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust' in Arundel was under water for two months. The flooding meant that birds could not roost, hibernating animals were flushed out, and their food sources were killed off.

The reserve has only just fully reopened - and visitors are slowly returning to the site. Managers say the money the charity has lost will impact on plans for conservation work. Charlotte Wilkins reports.

The interviewee is Paul Stevens, Grounds manager.

Wildlife reserve assesses impact of flooding on birds

A wildlife reserve in Sussex has revealed the impact the recent flooding has had on the animals in its care.

Much of site belonging to the charity 'The Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust' in Arundel was under water for two months. The flooding meant that birds could not roost, hibernating animals were flushed out, and their food sources were killed off.

The reserve has only just fully reopened - and visitors are slowly returning to the site. Managers say the money the firm has lost will impact on plans for conservation work. Charlotte Wilkins reports.

The interviewee is Paul Stevens, Grounds manager.

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Dormouse recovery due to habitat improvement

A dormouse at WWT Arundel Wetland Centre Credit: WWT

Work on the Arun Riverlife project involved cutting trees close to some hedgerows where dormice nest and this work was licensed by Natural England.

In the UK the dormouse has been protected since 1988 by the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.

During the tree work, licensed dormice handlers on the WWT Arundel team did daily hand searches of sections to be cut to ensure no dormice were in these zones.

Wildlife experts welcome return of "Ratty"

A recent survey of nesting boxes at the wetland reserve found four live dormice and 8 dormice nests inside the 61 nesting boxes onsite.

Two of the dormice found were nesting in boxes on the edges of the recently completed Arun Riverlife project.

WWT Arundel Wetland Centre Manager Dave Fairlamb said: “It’s great news that wildlife like dormice are moving back into the revitalized habitats of the Arun Riverlife project so quickly after the project was finished last June.”

Rare birds get extra help nesting

Conservationists in Sussex have hit on a novel way to help some rare birds nest successfully.

Most Common Terns lay their eggs on gravel beaches along the coast. The elegant birds are much scarcer than their name might suggest.

Staff at the Wetland Centre in Arundel have created floating rafts on one on the lakes, and the Terns have managed to raise a family.

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