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London Marathon runners invited to wear black ribbons

The organisers of the London Marathon have confirmed that runners will be encouraged to wear a black ribbon at the start of Sunday's race to honour victims of the attack on the Boston Marathon.

An email to runners this morning said:

"As a show of solidarity with our Boston friends, we would also like you to wear a black ribbon at Sunday's race.

You will have the opportunity to collect this ribbon when you register at the Expo to pick up your race number."

The email also said that a 30-second silence would observed at all three race starts and would be signalled by a whistle.

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Boston runner with family 'got off lightly'

Darren Foy, having just completed the Boston Marathon, with his children before blast.

Darren Foy, 40, from Southampton, his wife Sandra and their two children, missed the explosions by just half an hour after he finished the Boston Marathon in three and a half hours.

The chartered surveyor, who is chairman of the Lordshill Road Runners in Southampton and was competing in his fourth marathon, said: "There are reports here that the explosions came from a hotel at the finish line and I walked past there a few days ago to pick up my race number.

"It's such a soft target. There are hundreds of thousands spectators on the streets and 27,000 runners, so we got off lightly."

Region had more than 30 runners in marathon

More than 30 runners from our region were taking part in yesterday's Boston Marathon.

While some had completed the course when two explosions occurred near the finishing line, many were still running at the time.

Darren Foy, 40, from Southampton and his wife Sandra and their two children missed the explosions by just 30 minutes after he finished the marathon in three and half hours.

He said: "We were on our way home when we heard something had happened and I was getting messages like 'are you Ok?' which I never get. It's all quite shocking really."

Brighton runner in Boston says 'ground shook beneath her'

Abi Griffiths has been running the Boston Marathon. Credit: Abi Griffiths

Brighton runner Abi Griffiths crossed the finish line of the Boston Marathon around ten minutes before the explosions happened.

She said: "It was as I was retrieving my bag that I heard an explosion, now everyone sort of looked around and there was a moment of disbelief and bewilderment, you didn't exactly know what had happened, but a few seconds after that suddenly it went into a state of chaos.

"The sound of the explosion, the ground shook underneath my feet a bit, I mean, just, I've never heard a bomb before but there was just that sixth sense that something bad had happened."

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National

Police could review Thatcher funeral plans after Boston blasts

Former Metropolitan Police Officer Graham Whettone has told Daybreak that security protocols surrounding Margaret Thatcher's funeral will most likely be reviewed in light of what happened at the Boston Marathon.

He said: "If they need to advance [the plans] then they will do, there's different tactical options the police can employ at various events, they will just review those now, if they need to advancer them then they will do."

National

Report: 144 injured in Boston Marathon blasts

The total of people injured by blasts at the Boston Marathon has risen to 144 people, officials at Boston area hospitals said to CNN.

At least three people were killed by two blasts at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, police confirmed.

Doctors said that many of the injured who were admitted to hospital had severe leg injuries caused by shrapnel, and confirmed at least 10 amputations.

Read: Three dead in Boston race blasts.

National

British witness: Boston is 'such a soft target'

Runner Darren Foy, 40, from Southampton and his wife Sandra and their two children missed the explosions by just 30 minutes after he finished the marathon in three and half hours.

Speaking from the city, the chartered surveyor said:

We were on our way home when we heard something had happened and I was getting messages like 'are you Ok?' which I never get. It's all quite shocking really.

We got home and we looked at the BBC online and saw there had been explosions but we are OK because I finished in three and a half hours and we were on the bus when it happened.

We are staying five miles outside and I'm not intending to go back into the city for a few days.

It's such a soft target. There are hundreds of thousands spectators on the streets and 27,000 runners, so we got off lightly.

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