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Oxford explains inner workings of brain

The university have launched a new animation to replicate a MRI scan and how our brain works.

Dr Stuart Clare of Oxford University, lead scientific advisor on the animation, said:

‘The animation beautifully shows what is going on inside the body during an FMRI scan, right down to the atomic level, and how the very strong magnet at the core of the machine gives us incredible detail on brain function.

‘Ruby Wax has a real interest in the neuroscience of mental health, something that we are researching here in Oxford, and we were delighted that she agreed to voice the animation.’

Oxford uni gives insight into brain science

brain animation
The animation is the latest video from Oxford Sparks from Oxford University Credit: Karen Cheung

Oxford University have launched a new animation to look at our brain and how we move and talk.

The video is the latest from the web portal which gives people access to some of the exciting science happening at the university.

The animation shows what is going on inside the body during a MRI scan Credit: Karen Cheung

Ruby Wax narrates the animation where a Magnetic Resonance Kmaging (MRI) scanner sees inside our brains and detects surges of oxygenated blood to how we move.

brain scan
The scanner looks inside our brains Credit: Oxford University

Dr Stuart Clare of Oxford University, lead scientific advisor on the animation, said: ‘Functional MRI is revolutionising our understanding of the brain. As long as someone can do something lying down then we can scan their brain and discover the activity behind the action."

"As technology improves and magnet strength increases, we can determine finer detail about brain activity related to particular tasks or behaviours. This isn't just about finding out how our brains work, but also how they respond to damage or treatment.

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Praise for head injury charity

by David Johns (@davidjohns_itv)

She died for nine minutes when her heart stopped beating - and was brought back to life by paramedics. But Ria Hancock's brain had been damaged by a lack of oxygen.

Two years on the mum of two tries to lead a normal life, supported by her husband - and by a vital charity, Headway, which helps those with brain injuries. David Johns went to meet her.

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