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The Acropolis, Stonehenge... could Brighton seafront become a World Heritage Site?

Brighton seafront could one day have the kudos of Stonehenge, the Acropolis, Machu Pichu and Sydney Opera House.

Why? Because conservationists are preparing an audacious bid for World Heritage Status to help save areas like the crumbling Madeira Terraces.

Andy Dickenson reports and speaks to Roger Amerena of Brighton and Hove Heritage Commission, Austin Gayton of Studio 284, and Cllr Gill Mitchell.

Team-mate speaks of shock at Shoreham deaths

Tony Burnett played with Matt Grimstone and Jacob Schilt Credit: ITV Meridian

The footballing community in Sussex is in shock at the loss of two of their players in the Shoreham Airshow crash.

Worthing United footballers Matthew Grimstone and Jacob Schilt, who were both 23, were among at least 11 people who were killed when a plane crashed into the A27 on Saturday.

Team-mate Tony Burnett had known Matthew Grimstone for five years, playing alongside him with Mile Oak FC. He also played with Jacob Schilt and Matthew on Sundays at AFC Shoreham.

Mr Burnett said their team-mates are all in shock.

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Seagull attacks: 'Don't feed them and they won't be a problem'

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) has spoken out about managing seagulls, with numerous complaints being made about the birds' aggressive behaviour in Brighton.

A spokesperson for the animal charity said: "If we feed gulls they will grow more confident, they will learn that we are a source of food. They will not then distinguish between food offered and people simply walking around carrying food, cafe tables outdoors and the like."

Seagulls at Hove seafront Credit: PA

Brighton and Hove City Council have already said that culling the birds, which are protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act, might not be an option.

It is working on ensuring food waste is properly disposed of to avoid attracting the birds to control the population.

Credit: PA

In a statement, the council said: "Nuisance alone is not considered to be a reasonable justification for culling."

Despite the population of the birds declining in coastal areas, they are continuing to "do well" in urban areas, according to the RSPB.

The charity said: "Councils who have identified gulls as a nuisance would be right not to encourage feeding. And, to be honest, a diet entirely of chips and ice cream probably isn't giving the birds their five a day!"

Complaints about seagull numbers in Brighton

There have been complaints about seagulls throughout the region Credit: ITV

A seagull cull in Brighton and Hove may not be an option for controlling the large numbers in the city. That's according to the council which receives numerous reports about the birds. Seagulls are frequently criticised for swooping down to take food, and have gained a reputation for aggravating people. The local authority is trying to stop them nesting.

Over the top - fundraisers abseil down Brighton's Grand Hotel for blind ex-services charity

More than one hundred volunteers abseiled down one of Brighton's most iconic buildings. They were raising money for the charity Blind Veterans UK which helps ex-servicemen and women.

Malcolm Shaw went to the Grand Hotel to see the abseilers in action, and spoke to Cara Butler, the youngest to take part, blind veteran Martin Shail, and Lesley Garven of Blind Veterans UK.

Brighton and Hove named "Sanctuary on Sea" for welcoming refugees fleeing conflict and persecution

"Asylum seeker" has become an emotive term in recent years, and the reasons people seek safety here aren't always fully understood.

The city of Brighton and Hove has a long history of accommodating refugees, and now it's been named "Sanctuary on Sea" in recognition of its work to welcome victims of conflict and persecution abroad.

Malcolm Shaw spoke to Reem Abushawareb from Iraq, Sylvie Collier of Pond Pictures, Jenny Lansdell, Chair of Sanctuary on Sea, and Teresa Gomez from Chile.

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