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Gravesend's giant Conga for Stacey

Hundreds of people have been fundraising today for a little girl with a rare form of cancer called Neuroblastoma. Stacey Mowle's parents want to send her to America for specialist treatment.

Today they tried to break the record for the UK's longest Conga hoping to raise the half a million pounds they need. It's the latest event in their campaign, which has also involved holding their own Bushtucker trial.

Andrea Thomas went along to see the attempt and find out more about the appeal. She spoke to Stacey and her Dad Warren.

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UK's biggest conga attempt to help save Stacey

7-year old-Stacey has a rare form of cancer

A community's attempt to save the life of a 7-year-old girl who has the rare form of cancer, Neuroblastoma, takers another step forward today. Time is not on Stacey Mowle's side. She's being treated at the Royal Marsden, but needs to try pioneering treatment in America.

Kate Middleton helping Stacey draw a picture

Today, campaigners will try to break the UK record for the biggest Conga, with up to 2000 people taking part. It's one of many madcap fundraising efforts, including a Bushtucker Trial, complete with sheep's brains and mealworms.

Scientists announce progress in childhood cancer study

Scientists have been researching possible treatments for childhood cancer Credit: University of Southampton

Cancer Research UK scientists from the University of Southampton say there is new hope in the fight against childhood cancer. They have said they are seeing positive results in a pre-clinical trial that could bring treatments for a particular form of childhood cancer closer to reality.

Their study published in 'Clinical Cancer Research' has found that two antibodies developed by the Hampshire team help to boost the immune system to fight neuroblastoma - a form of childhood cancer which grows from undeveloped tissue of the nervous system.

Dr Juliet Gray, Senior Lecturer in Paediatric Oncology said: "Although this work is still at a pre-clinical stage, we hope it has enabled us to identify a way that we can provide effective immunotherapy treatment against neuroblastoma.

"More research is needed to understand how these antibodies work and how they should be used to treat neuroblastoma.

"Six out of ten children with neuroblastoma can be successfully treated with conventional chemotherapy.

"But for those children who don't respond well to this treatment, immunotherapy could become a vital new treatment option.".

Simple check saved my life

Ryan Walshe's life was saved by pure chance. Now he's trying to persuade teenage boys to join a campaign to prevent testicular cancer. Tom Savvides talks to Ryan from Brighton, Rebecca Porta from the charity Orchid and Dr David Bloomfield from the Sussex Cancer Centre.

More information about the campaign and testicular cancer can be found at:

www.orchid-cancer.org.uk

www.nhs.uk

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Town crier backs 'Race for Life' after cancer diagnosis

A town crier who won ITV Meridian's "Crier Idol" after we launched a competition in the region a few years ago, is fighting a new battle.

John Melody from Southampton has been diagnosed with cancer. He is supporting this year's 'Race for Life' as a way of thanking the doctors who have been helping him with his condition. Andrew Pate reports.

Street's fears for cancer stats - full story

Tests are being carried out in a street to see if the homes are causing people to get cancer. 16 people have died over the past 10 years in Mickle Way in Oxford - a cul-de-sac of 80 homes in Forest Hill on the outskirts of the city.

The local housing authority says it's taking residents worries very seriously and is looking into claims that asbestos is to blame. Penny Silvester has more and speaks to resident David Hawkins.

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