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Fred interviews CQC about its report that criticises Southern Health's leadership

ITV Meridian presenter Fred Dinenage interviewed Karen Bennett-Wilson from the Care Quality Commission about its report into the failings of the Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust.

The interview with the CQC was followed by reaction from the Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt MP.

Although the CQC report was critical of Southern Health's leadership, neither official would be drawn on whether the organisation's Chief Executive, Katrina Percy, should step down from her post.

Southern Health Chief Katrina Percy: CQC's report 'sends a clear message to the trust's leadership'

Southern Health Chief Executive Katrina Percy at a public meeting earlier this year

The Chief Executive of the Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust, Katrina Percy, issued the following statement in response to a critical report from the Care Quality Commission after an inspection of her organisation's services and care provision.

“Today's CQC report sends a clear message to the leadership of the Trust that more improvements must be delivered and as rapidly as possible. I want to reassure our patients, their families and carers that I am absolutely focused on addressing the CQC's concerns and supporting our staff to provide the best care possible.

As well as rightly highlighting areas of concern, I am pleased that the CQC recognises our staff's caring attitude to patients and the progress made in a number of units, including one of our community mental health teams our mental health inpatient units and our Child and Adolescent Mental Health services. This progress reflects the unwavering dedication of our staff, and my job is to make sure these improvements are now carried through consistently across all our services.

We fully accept that until we address all these concerns and our new reporting and investigating procedures introduced in December 2015 are completely effective, we will remain, rightly, under intense scrutiny. We will continue to share regular updates on progress publicly to demonstrate improvement and help re-build trust in our services.”

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'Hospital safer, cleaner' Medway NHS Trust's response to CQC report

The Chief Executive of Medway NHS Foundation Trust has responded to the Care Quality Commission assessment of the trust's care for patients following an inspection in March.

“Our ambition is to provide the best possible care to the people of Kent and Medway, and we know we still have a long way to go before we achieve that. Although we will remain in special measures, I am very pleased that the CQC has recognised that we have made significant improvements over the last few months. This is a tribute to the hard work our staff have put in to understand what wasn’t working, and make changes to benefit our patients.

“Since the CQC were here last summer, we have made the hospital safer, cleaner and more responsive to the needs of patients. Patients are now seen quicker when they arrive at the Emergency Department, see fewer different doctors, and are discharged to the comfort of their own homes quicker.

“But we recognise that there is considerably more to do. We are acutely conscious that we need to address staffing levels and recruit more permanent colleagues to reduce our dependency on agency staff. Having tackled many of the safety and quality issues in the Trust, we also need to turn our attention to making the Trust as efficient as possible. So we will continue to work tirelessly over the next few months to make improvements and ensure we provide the service that the people of Kent and Medway deserve.”

– Lesley Dwyer, Chief Executive of Medway NHS Foundation Trust
  1. Tom Savvides

Struggling hospital on the road to recovery

It's been dubbed the worst hospital in the country but after almost three years in special measures, Medway Maritime has now started to make progress. An interim report shows the hospital is safer and leadership has improved. Maternity services are also rated good. However, staff shortages and low morale still need to be tackled. Inspectors say the hospital is now on the road to recovery but it will remain in special measures for the next six months. Tom Savvides has the latest.

Medway Hospital Trust making improvements

An interim report into care at Medway Maritime Hospital has found significant improvements have been made over the last few months.

Earlier this year the NHS trust which runs the hospital was advised it would remain in "special measures".

However inspectors say they're still concerned about emergency care, surgery and outpatient services.

Medway NHS Foundation Trust was placed in special measures last year Credit: ITV Meridian

“Our ambition is to provide the best possible care to the people of Kent and Medway, and we know we still have a long way to go before we achieve that. Although we will remain in special measures, I am very pleased that the CQC has recognised that we have made significant improvements over the last few months. This is a tribute to the hard work our staff have put in to understand what wasn’t working, and make changes to benefit our patients.

“Since the CQC were here last summer, we have made the hospital safer, cleaner and more responsive to the needs of patients. Patients are now seen quicker when they arrive at the Emergency Department, see fewer different doctors, and are discharged to the comfort of their own homes quicker.

“But we recognise that there is considerably more to do. We are acutely conscious that we need to address staffing levels and recruit more permanent colleagues to reduce our dependency on agency staff. Having tackled many of the safety and quality issues in the Trust, we also need to turn our attention to making the Trust as efficient as possible. So we will continue to work tirelessly over the next few months to make improvements and ensure we provide the service that the people of Kent and Medway deserve.”

– Lesley Dwyer, Chief Executive of Medway NHS Foundation Trust

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CQC publishes reports on care homes in South

In the past week the Care Quality Commission has published further reports on the quality of care provided by adult social care services across the South of England.

Under CQC’s new programme of inspections, all of England’s adult social care services regulated by CQC, are being given a rating according to whether they are safe, effective, caring, responsive and well led.

Reports have been published on the following care homes:

  • Dane House Care Home - Brighton and Hove
  • Oxford House Community Care - Buckinghamshire
  • Caremark (Eastbourne & Wealden) - East Sussex
  • Brendoncare Alton - Hampshire
  • Kents Oak Rest Home - Hampshire
  • Maypole Nursing Centre - Hampshire
  • Hartwood House - Hampshire
  • Westbury House Nursing Home - Hampshire

"People are entitled to services which provide safe, effective, compassionate and high quality care. If that is what we find on inspection - we give the service a rating of Good, or Outstanding. If we find that a service requires improvement, we will expect them to provide us with a full plan setting out how they will address the issue. We will share our findings with local commissioners, and we will return in due course to check that they have made the required improvements. Whenever we find a service to be Inadequate, we will consider taking further action on behalf of the people who use the service, so providers of those service should take the publication of the inadequate rating as a signal that immediate action is required to improve the service”

– Adrian Hughes, CQC's Deputy Chief Inspector for Adult Social Care

NHS Trust rated 'Good' but some services need 'Improvement'

The services provided by Sussex Community NHS Trust have been rated 'Good' by the Chief Inspector of Hospitals.

The rating follows an inspection by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) across West Sussex and Brighton & Hove.

However, the Trust was told its community health impatient services 'Requires Improvement' for its safety, and its end of life care rated as 'Outstanding' for how it responds to people's needs.

The trust provides care for around eight thousand people a day at several sites including Arundel Hospital, Midhurst Community Hospital, Horsham Hospital and Brighton General Hospital.

At the time of CQC's inspection, the trust had appointed a new leadership team, and the CQC acknowledged that many of the team had only been in their new jobs for a short time, including the Director of Nursing who had been in post for less than a year.

The Inspectors noted some areas of good practice, including a 'Major Incident Box' at Arundel Hospital in the staff room which contained everything staff would need to manage an incident.

Hospital warned after surprise inspection

Medway NHS Foundation Trust needs to improve the care patients receive at the emergency department at Medway Maritime Hospital in Gillingham.

That's the finding of the Care Quality Commission, after it carried out an unannounced inspection, following an anonymous tip-off.

The CQC has told the trust to make urgent improvements at the hospital, in Windmill Road, following a surprise inspection in December. Inspectors found the hospital was failing to meet the national standards relating to care and welfare of people, and cleanliness and infection control.

Warning notices were issued to the trust in both areas. A full report from this inspection has been published on the CQC website today.

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