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  1. National

Michael Gove 'lost support of teachers and parents'

Outgoing Education secretary Michael Gove had "lost the support of the profession and parents", the National Union of Teachers has said.

NUT protests against Michael Gove in Bristol last year. Credit: Tim Ireland/PA Archive

"His pursuit of the unnecessary and often unwanted free schools and academies programme, the use of unqualified teachers, the failure to address the school place crisis and endless ill-thought out reforms to examinations and the curriculum have been his hallmark in office," the group said.

“Michael Gove’s search for headlines over speaking to the profession has clearly angered teachers. We remain in dispute over the direction of Government policy, which we believe is undermining the education service."

“We will be seeking a very early meeting with Nicky Morgan, the incoming Education Secretary, and we look forward to not only a new personality but a more conciliatory approach, one that demonstrates an improvement in policy for children, teachers and young people.”

  1. Phil Hornby, Political Correspondent

Fallon finally gets government department to run

Michael Fallon, the MP for Sevenoaks, has a government department to run - at last.

He has long been regarded as the safest pair of hands in Westminster.

When the government was in trouble, they always "sent for Fallon".

Mr Cameron made him a minister in the Business Department partly, it's been suggested, to "keep an eye on" Vince Cable.

He was also made Minister for Portsmouth when shipbuilding ended there.

He will still be a regular visitor to the city in his new role as Defence Secretary.

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  1. National

Unions attack Cabinet reshuffle as 'window dressing'

Unions embroiled in pay disputes with the Government have played down the impact of the Cabinet reshuffle on policies they believe hinder the rights and pay interests of workers.

This is simply an attempt at window dressing to make the Government look more women-friendly.

But if you look behind the gloss, you will see that the Tory policies are having a huge impact on women, in a bad way.

– Dave Prentis, general secretary of Unison
  1. Phil Hornby, Political Correspondent

Scale of reshuffle has taken Westminster by surprise

Prime Minister is announcing his reshuffle today Credit: PA

This is the boldest, biggest reshuffle I can remember. The scale of it has taken everyone by surprise. Brave? Or reckless?

William Hague's "demotion" seems to have been voluntary. Surrey Heath's Michael Gove's "demotion" certainly wasn't. He has paid the price for annoying his senior colleagues once too often, but will be an unusual Chief Whip. They are usually pretty silent in public: he won't be.

As always the reshuffle claims victims, many of whom are blameless. David Willetts, the Havant MP, has impressed many as Universities Minister after the initial shock of the tuition fees increase.

Ashford's Damian Green was a popular police minister. Faversham and Mid Kent's Hugh Robertson was one of the best sports ministers, and recently has impressed at the Foreign Office.

None of them is likely to cause trouble from the backbenches for Mr Cameron - some of the others who've been disappointed won't go so quietly.

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  1. National

Osborne: Morgan will be 'brilliant' Education Secretary

Chancellor George Osborne has paid tribute to Nicky Morgan as she surprisingly replaces Michael Gove as Education Secretary in the Cabinet reshuffle.

  1. National

Gove discusses reshuffle shortly before surprise move

Michael Gove told ITV News he was "privileged" to be part of the Prime Minister's Cabinet shortly before it was announced he has been removed as Education Secretary during the reshuffle.

"Every job in Cabinet is there on the basis of the Prime Minister's decision about who is the best individual to do any individual job," he said.

Mr Gove, who takes up the role as Commons Chief Whip, also paid tribute to William Hague as a "fantastic Foreign Secretary".

Hampshire MP retires as Chief Whip in reshuffle

Sir George Young is MP for the North West Hampshire constituency Credit: PA

Sir George Young, known in Westminster as the bicycling baronet, has announced his resignation as chief whip.

The veteran MP has already left David Cameron's Government once, only to be called back in to replace fellow cyclist Andrew Mitchell after he quit in the wake of the the "plebgate" row with Downing Street police in October 2010.

The 72-year-old, an MP since 1974, is one of the most experienced members of the coalition Government, having previously held office under Margaret Thatcher and John Major.

He was subsequently made shadow leader of the Commons by Mr Cameron and took up the role on the Government side when the coalition came to power after the May 2010 general election.

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