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Parents on alert after little girl approached by stranger

Parents in Deal have been alerted after a pupil on her way home from school was approached by a stranger.

The young girl was walking along Cliffe Road in Kingsdown when a man helped her carry her bike up some steps.

He then put his arms round her and started asking her questions but she managed to grab her bike and run to her mother.

Police described the man as white, in his thirties and 5ft 6in tall, with receding dark hair.

  1. Sarah Saunders @SSaundersITV

VIDEO: Read all about it! Local paper celebrates 150 years

In 1865 a 2-mile-per-hour speed limit was introduced on British roads, slavery was abolished in the US - and the first edition of the East Kent Mercury was published.

In recent times the local paper has faced challenges from other newspapers and the trend towards internet news, but as the paper celebrates 150 years in print, the editor says its values remain the same - quality local journalism and a community focus. Sarah Saunders reports.

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Man charged with murder of a missing woman

Detectives investigating a report of a missing woman in Deal have charged a man with murder.

Mariola Cudworth, also known as Mijka, was reported missing from her home in Northbourne on Thursday 30 April.

Missing Mariola Cudworth Credit: Kent Police

The last known contact with Mijka was just before midnight on Tuesday 28 April and she remains missing.

Detectives have charged Jonathon Cudworth, 34, of Northbourne in Deal, with murder.

He has been remanded in custody to appear at Medway Magistrates’ Court via video link on Friday 8 May.

War memorial listed to mark the Gallipoli campaign centenary

St George's Church war memorial in Deal Credit: Historic England

· War memorials listed to mark the Gallipoli Campaign centenary

· The Gallipoli Campaign is one of the key centenaries being marked by national ceremonial events as part of the First World War commemorations

· The memorials serve as a physical reminder of the heavy losses from one of the most notable military actions of the First World War

A war memorial in Kent associated with Gallipoli, one of the most notable military actions of the First World War, has been listed to mark the centenary of the Gallipoli campaign.

It's one of several memorials listed as part of a Historic England scheme to list up 2500 war memorials over the next five years to mark the centenary of the First World War.

Built in the years following the conflict, war memorials are a poignant, physical reminder of the sacrifices and loss the First World War brought about.

St George’s Church War Memorial Cross has been listed at Grade II. It was originally a private family memorial to two sons, one of whom, Arthur Tisdall, was killed at Gallipoli.

Later it was decided to add the names of other men from the parish who died as the War progressed. Arthur Tisdall, Sub-Lieutenant who was in command of 13 Platoon, D Company, Anson Battalion, was awarded a Victoria Cross for his bravery at Gallipoli for his repeated efforts to rescue a number of wounded soldiers who were pinned down on the beach by Turkish machine gun fire.

Before the war, he had also received a University of Cambridge’s Chancellor’s Medal for Classical Learning. The two very different medals of this exceptional scholar-soldier are represented in accurate, life-sized, bronzes on the memorial shaft.

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Deal bombing letters from Thatcher and Bush to go on display

Letters of condolence from President Bush and Margaret Thatcher sent to the Royal Marines in the wake of the IRA Deal bombing in 1989 will go on display in Portsmouth.

Margaret Thatcher looks at floral tributes after the bombing in 1989 Credit: Press Association

A watch worn by one of the bandsmen injured in the blast, badly damaged but still showing the exact time the bomb went off, will also go on view.

The items are being presented to the Royal Marines School of Music for display in its new Memorial Room to mark the 25th anniversary of the bombing.

The explosion at Deal barracks in Kent - then home to the school of music - took place on September 22 1989. As well as the 11 servicemen killed, 22 were seriously injured. The barracks and several nearby homes were extensively damaged.

Cap and bugle at scene of bomb blast Credit: Press Association

In days following the blast, Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and US President George H W Bush wrote letters to the Royal Marines Principal Director of Music, Lieutenant Colonel John Ware.

Mrs Thatcher wrote to Lt Col Ware after he accompanied her to visit the wounded in hospital.

Deal barracks following the blast Credit: Press Association

"It has been a devastating blow for everyone in the Royal Marines as well as for the people of Deal. "I wanted to show on my visit that the whole country is intent on sharing your sorrow, but also in admiration for the courage and fortitude of the Royal Marines and their band which gives so much pleasure to so many people year after year," she wrote.

Lt Col Ware has now chosen to present the letters to the school of music - which re-located to Portsmouth in 1996 - for permanent display in honour of those killed and injured.

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