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  1. David Johns (@davidjohns_itv)

Dungeness estate yours for £1.5m

How do you fancy getting your hands on a country landscape by the sea? Well the Dungeness estate has gone on sale.

It's almost five hundred acres of desert-like terrain, jutting out into the English channel, shifting banks of shingle with a nuclear power station at its tip.

David Johns has been to see what you get for your money.

He spoke to estate trustee Maurice Ede, nature reserve manager Owen Leyshon, and estate agent Will Whittaker.


Demolition progress at obsolete nuclear power plant

Demolition of the largest building at the obsolete nuclear power station Dungeness A is nearing completion. The 26 metre-high turbine hall is being knocked down as the site, which closed in 2006, is decommissioned and made safe. Sarah Saunders went along to watch as the building was torn down and spoke to Paul Wilkinson, Site Director and Andy Dyson, Demolition Engineer.

Nearly 1,000 jobs secured as Dungeness Power Station life is extended by 10 years

The life of Dungeness Power Station in Kent is to be extended by 10 years, safeguarding nearly a thousand jobs. The plant, operated by energy giant EDF, will continue in operation until 2028 thanks to a 150 million pound investment.But environmentalists say the money should be spent on renewable energy. Iain McBride reports.

Extension of Dungeness is 'bad news', says MEP

“10 more years of unsafe and expensive nuclear energy production is bad news. Instead we should be focusing our efforts on the switch to a truly sustainable energy future – one which focuses on renewable energy and energy efficiency, and which would deliver more jobs, faster carbon reductions and a fundamentally more democratic energy system fit for the future.”

– Keith Taylor Green MEP for South East England


Dungeness B life extended by a decade

EDF Energy has extended the expected life of its Dungeness B nuclear power station by ten years.

This means it is due to continue generating low carbon electricity until 2028, producing enough power each year to supply the equivalent of 1.5m homes.

Credit: EDF

The decision has been made possible by a £150m investment programme to extend the life of the station. It comes after extensive reviews of the plant’s safety cases and work with the independent nuclear regulator, the Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR).

The life extension at Dungeness B is part of a wider EDF Energy programme to extend the lives of its eight nuclear power stations.

According to EDF, it will secure 550 jobs and work for 200 contractors at the site, as well as maintaining essential expertise in engineering and the UK nuclear industry.

Young apprentices have the power

More and more young people are now choosing to become an apprentice rather than go onto university - partly due to the rising cost of a degree.

At Dungeness Power Station, a scheme to recruit six is underway. But competition is tough, because each post attracts around three hundred applications. This from David Johns.

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