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  1. Derek Johnson

Harbour plans divide opinion

Plan for a new half-billion pound harbour scheme have been revealed for Sussex. Hastings seafront would be changed hugely by the scheme. The council will submit it for formal planning permission later this month, but as Derek Johnson says, not everyone is convinced.

His report contains interviews with Stuart Hamilton a fisherman, with Andrew Doyle from Hastings Harbour Quarter Ltd, and Cllr Peter Chowney the leader of Hastings council.

Boat involved in collision off Sussex coast identified

A search began after the boat sunk on Sunday Credit: ITV Meridian

A vessel which is believed to have collided with a fishing boat off the coast of Shoreham on Sunday morning, causing the smaller boat to sink, has been identified.

The body of one fisherman has been found, two others are missing and a fourth fisherman was recovered alive.

He had been clinging to a buoy for more than five hours.

Traiam Dumitrache died after the collision on Sunday Credit: Sussex Police

The man who died has been formally identified as 50 year old Traiam Dumitrache, a Romanian national from London.

Police say they are in touch with the owners of the scallop dredging boat, Vertrouwen.

The owners, MacDuff Shellfish Ltd, are co-operating with the operation.

The vessel left Shoreham around the same time of the incident at the weekend bound for Grimsby.

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New project to restore oysters to The Solent

The Solent was once the largest oyster fishery in Europe. Its waters were reknowned for the mollusc - known as 'the poor man's food' because it was so abundant.

However, over-fishing brought the Solent oyster to the brink of extinction until catching them was banned in 2013.

Now a major environmental project - fronted by TV presenter Ben Fogle, aims to restore the oyster population there by putting millions back. Martin Dowse reports.

In or out? Fishermen give us their views on the EU Referendum

With the EU referendum just weeks away, some of us are still deciding whether to vote in or out. And nowhere is the debate more impassioned than in the fishing industry.

Many inshore fisherman say quotas imposed by Brussels have destroyed their livelihoods.

Others say the limits on what can be caught have been vital to protect dwindling fish stocks.

Malcolm Shaw reports now from Hastings, where fishing has been a way of life for over 1000 years.

Deep sea fishing could contribute to global warming

Scientists at the University of Southampton's National Oceanography Centre have discovered that fish living in very deep water are responsible for removing and storing millions of tonnes of CO2 from the atmosphere.

If too many of them are caught then that could have a detrimental effect on climate change.

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Chad the Carp treated for injuries after his escape

Chad was injured when someone tried to catch him with an inappropriate hook Credit: Romsey World of Water

Chad the Carp is safe and well and is being treated for injuries to his tail and side. He has now been reunited with his best friend, Steve the Sturgeon. Both escaped from Romsey World of Water during the recent floods. Steve the Sturgeon was recovered, but Chad remained on the missing list.

A couple who were walking their dog spotted Chad near the Salmon Leap pub in Totton - seven miles away -and gave him some bread. Rob Bailey from Romsey World of Water left a bread trail and recaptured Chad.

Chad is treated for his wounds Credit: Romsey World of Water

Staff at Romsey World of Water treated Chad's wounds. A hook had to be cut in half before being removed. Chad is making a good recovery.

Fishy friends reunited after the floods

Chad the Carp has been reunited with his best friend, Steve the Sturgeon. Both escaped from Romsey World of Water during the recent floods. Steve the Sturgeon was recovered, but Chad remained on the missing list.

A couple who were walking their dog spotted Chad near the Salmon Leap pub in Totton - seven miles away -and gave him some bread.

Rob Bailey from Romsey World of Water left a bread trail and recaptured Chad. More details to follow.

Fish crime crackdown to protect Solent salmon

A triple hook used to catch the fish Credit: Environment Agency

The Environment Agency is launching a new project to protect Salmon stocks in the Solent.

The Salmon Watch campaign is part of the Environment Agency's ongoing crackdown against fish theft and illegal angling.

Rivers in Hampshire are world famous for their salmon populations but surveys on the River Test and Itchen show that numbers are well below their conservation target.

A speargun is one of the methods used to illegally catch salmon fish Credit: Environment Agency

Since a previous anti-poaching campaign in 2012, Environment Agency Fisheries Officers have arrested or cautioned five poachers who were caught fishing illegally as a direct result of reports received from the public.

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