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BA to run full flight schedule after major IT failure

Disruption at Terminal 5 on Saturday Credit: Vambak

British Airways says it is planning to run a full schedule at Gatwick and Heathrow today.

A global IT failure over the bank holiday weekend left 75,000 people with their flights cancelled or delayed.

The airline says it is working to get delayed bags to passengers.

Some were stuck in queues for hours, with many unable to check-in using the mobile phone app causing them to miss flights.

The latest information can be found on their website.

We are extremely sorry for the frustration and inconvenience customers experienced over the Bank Holiday weekend and thank them for their patience and understanding."

– BA spokesperson

Gatwick April figures up 15% on April 2016

Gatwick Airport has revealed that 3.8 million passengers travelled through its gates in April, up 15% on April 2016. Some of that additional traffic is being attributed to the entire Easter school holiday period taking place during April this year.

"Gatwick's vital role for Britain shines through our latest traffic figures as the airport continues to go from strength to strength as we gear up for our biggest Summer yet.

"Confidence in Gatwick is unrelenting as our existing carriers increase frequencies, Cathay Pacific will be providing a daily connection Gatwick to Hong Kong from June, and new routes are announced.

"We continue our trailblazing low-cost long-haul revolution, bringing more parts of the Globe within reach of more Britons, with the World's furthest low-cost long-haul connection just announced between Gatwick and Singapore, from Norwegian.

"Our booming long-haul routes have driven a huge cargo increase and at this crucial time for the country and the economy, Gatwick continues to stand ready and offers the UK Government a credible and deliverable option for runway expansion."

– Stewart Wingate, Gatwick Airport, Chief Executive Officer

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Most advanced baggage technology for Gatwick

For airline passengers there is nothing worse than delayed or lost bags.

Now the most advanced technology in the world has been introduced at Gatwick Airport aimed at helping all bags make their flights. According to the latest worldwide figures 24 million items are misplaced every year, many when passengers are transferring flights overseas.

In Europe alone the figure is estimated at 10,000 a day. But the industry say the figures are down 60% over the last decade and airports are more determined than ever to improve.

Our Transport Correspondent Mike Pearse has been given exclusive access behind the scenes to see the new baggage technology at Gatwick's South Terminal which is part of an upgrade costing almost £200m. ​

He spoke to Nikki Barton the Head of Terminals & Passenger Services.

Advice for travellers: lost, delayed or damaged baggage

Credit: ITV

The Civil Aviation Authority have provided information and advice on what to do if you get to your destination airport and your baggage does not appear on the carousel. Baggage is most often lost or delayed when you have transferred en-route between planes, or between airlines.

What happens when luggage is lost? When hold luggage is lost, delayed or damaged airlines are liable for your losses. However, there are no rules which fix the amount of compensation you should receive. It will depend on the value of what you have lost and the maximum will be around £1000, however, it would be very rare for you to receive this much.

What can I do? Make sure you label your luggage. It can help to include your name, address and email address on the inside of the baggage in case the tags on the outside are lost.

Will I be reimbursed for delayed luggage? Most airlines will reimburse you for the bare essentials you need to buy when your bag is delayed. If you are away from home this may cover essential toiletries, underwear and laundry costs. If your bag is delayed on your return home, airlines may consider that your losses were less as you had clothes and other essentials available to you. Some airlines have a daily rate which they will pay per day your bag is delayed.

If you are claiming for a lost or damaged bag when you have been on two or more different airlines on a journey, you can claim from any of the airlines, however it would usually be the final airline that would handle the claim so they are a good place to start.

What about damage? If your baggage is damaged, you should report upon arrival at the airport. Most airlines have a dedicated baggage desk within the baggage claims area. You may receive a Property Irregularity Report (also known as PIR.) You will also need to put in a written claim to the airline within seven days. Having a PIR is no guarantee that the airline will accept your claim. If the airline accept your claim, they may pay for your baggage to be repaired, or may provide replacement baggage.

How do I make a claim? You must report the fact that your luggage has been lost, delayed or damaged at the airport and keep a copy of the Property Irregularity Report which staff of the airline will complete. To make a claim you must then contact the airline in writing:

Within seven days for lost or stolen items, or damaged baggage You will have to demonstrate that your bag and its contents were worth the amount you are claiming by using receipts, credit card records or any other proof of value. Airlines also do not allow for “new for old” replacement when considering the value of your claim. They will look at the value of the item based on its age when lost. Within 21 days for delayed bags from receiving the delayed bagConsequential lossesAirlines do not automatically consider themselves liable for the losses you incur following on from your bag being delayed unless forced to do so by a court. For example, if you miss the start of a cruise you were booked on because you had to wait 24 hours for your bag to arrive at the airport, this will not routinely be refunded. You would have to take legal action and ask a court to award this extra compensation if the airline refuses.

Insurance It might be better to claim on your travel insurance as airlines may not pay out the true cost of what a lost, delayed or damaged bag has cost you. However, travel insurance is likely to have an excess, typically around £40. There is often a time limit for submitting a claim depending on the policy.

- Source: Civil Aviation Authority (CAA)

Breakfast TV host says wait for luggage was longer than flight

Twenty-four million items of baggage are mislaid at airports every year, so now, Gatwick Airport has introduced some of the most advanced technology in the world to tackle the problem.

In Europe alone the figure is estimated at ten thousand lost bags a day.

Among those unhappy about delayed bags is ITV Good Morning Britain presenter Piers Morgan:

The Civil Aviation Authority provides advice for travellers whose luggage has been lost, delayed or damaged. Here is their advice about delayed luggage:

Most airlines will reimburse you for the bare essentials you need to buy when your bag is delayed. If you are away from home this may cover essential toiletries, underwear and laundry costs. If your bag is delayed on your return home, airlines may consider that your losses were less as you had clothes and other essentials available to you. Some airlines have a daily rate which they will pay per day your bag is delayed.

If you are claiming for a lost or damaged bag when you have been on two or more different airlines on a journey, you can claim from any of the airlines, however it would usually be the final airline that would handle the claim so they are a good place to start.

Passenger jets have near miss over Gatwick

Stock photo: an airbus takes off from an airport Credit: PA images

A passenger jet taking off from Gatwick Airport was involved in a near miss with another aircraft, according to an official investigation.

The UK Airprox Board said the incident on 25th April involved two Airbuses. They say the miss was caused by the air traffic controller not scanning his radar properly, but that emergency systems would have prevented a crash.

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