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Help for people sleeping rough this Christmas

The Borough of Poole is urging anyone concerned about people sleeping rough to contact the national initiative Streetlink.

The council says: "Please call Streetlink on 0300 5000 914. This ensures that the council can offer services to people who might need them.

"As well as the Streetlink hotline number, people can also download the smartphone app or use the ‘Report It’ function on boroughofpoole.com to report their concerns for a rough sleeper.

"Anyone can become homeless, and sleeping rough can be dangerous and damaging to health. The longer someone sleeps rough, the greater the risk that they will become trapped on the streets and vulnerable to becoming a victim of crime, developing drug or alcohol problems, or experiencing problems with their health."

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Neighbours 'share the warmth' with the homeless

The donated winter coats will be used by the homeless Credit: ITV Meridiian

Neighbours Jenny Barrett and Gaynor Williams have launched a pop-up campaign to help the homeless this Christmas. The two women from Hove have been asking Sussex residents to dig out their unused winter coats and jackets to help keep people living on the streets a little bit warmer this winter.

The super-quick campaign called Share the Warmth (Brighton and Hove Coat Collection) aims to capture Christmas goodwill for the cause and already has the support of the Big Beach Cafe and other local business people.

Gaynor, a freelance marketing consultant, said: 'We decided we'd need to get cracking as soon as possible and we've contacted as many people as we can. We've had lots of support already. Now we need people to look in their wardrobes and donate as many coats as they can.'

Coats, jackets and warm clothing can be dropped off at collections points in Brighton and Hove: Portslade Learning Centre, Big Beach Cafe, Drury Cafe, Tree of Life Centre, Walk in Wardrobe, Gelato Gusto, Honeycomb Cakes, Eaton Place Surgery and Langtons Hair and Beauty.

There will also be a collection at Brighton Railway Station on 19 December and at the Amex Stadium on 21 December.

A place to call home...

Earlier this month, ITV News revealed that Brighton and Hove's homelessness problem had risen by a shocking 35 per cent in two years.

Today a significant step was taken to address the problem as more than 30 homeless people began moving into a development made out of old shipping containers which have been converted in to studio flats.

Charlotte Wilkins speaks to Richard, who's just moved in; Andy Winter from Brighton Housing Trust and Councillor Bill Randall, who's Chair of Housing at Brighton and Hove City Council.

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First container home in place in Brighton

The first container home for homeless people in Brighton being put in place Credit: ITV News Meridian

The first container homes for homeless people in Brighton are being put in place today.

The converted containers will provide temporary homes for 36 men and women with a history of homelessness.

The first three containers will arrive at 7am, 8am and 9am, followed by a further 3 at 1pm, 2pm and 3pm. The remaining 30 containers will arrive by the end of the week.

The first resident will be able to move in in 5 weeks time.

The initiative has been developed by Brighton Housing Trust and Developers QED Estates Ltd as a means to deal with a housing shortage in Brighton and Hove.

Sub-zero sleep out raises £1,000 for homeless

Students Olivia Millward and Holly Pearson Credit: Barton Peveril

A sponsored sleep out by students at Barton Peveril Sixth Form College in Eastleigh has raised at least £1,000 for homeless charity Crisis.

Thirty students and four staff spent a night in sub-zero temperatures with only boxes, bags and blankets for shelter.

The event took place on campus and was organised by the Student Committee who will be collecting donations until mid-April.

Students created a 'cardboard village' for the night. Credit: Barton Peveril

Student Committee president, Harry Spicer, said: “No-one here can imagine doing this every day. We’re well aware that our experience was a very tame version of a harsh reality and that we were fuelled by the energy and adrenalin of it all.

“I think it’s given us all the ability to empathise more, but we still don’t really understand what it’s like to be homeless. These are real people and they need a little bit of love and compassion.”

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