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Tired doctors make mistakes say protesting medics

Doctors from across the Meridian region have joined a protest march in London against plans which they say will see them working longer hours for less pay. The Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt wants to reclassify doctors' normal working week to include Saturdays and late evening working. They say it could mean pay cuts of up to 30%, with "normal hours" reclassified as being from 7am to 10pm, Monday to Saturday. Extra payments for unsociable working will be earned only outside of these times, rather than the current arrangements of 7am to 7pm Monday to Friday. Erica Pool is a junior doctor at Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton and Amaran Cumarasny a medical student.

Juniors doctors gather for protest over new contracts

Junior doctors protest in Brighton ahead of London rally Credit: John Ryall

Junior doctors from across the region have been gathering for a protest against planned changes to their contracts.

A demonstration was held outside Brighton railway station by some junior doctors ahead of their journey to the capital for the main demonstration through the centre of London.

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Labour: Hunt should stop 'high-handed demands' on doctors

Labour's shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander is expected to call on Jeremy Hunt to "stop the high-handed demands" on junior doctors at a rally against proposed contract changes.

She will say:

It’s wrong that this Government is OK with the idea of paying some junior doctors less to do the work they do now. They’re wrong to want to remove the safeguards which prevent junior doctors from having to work excessive and exhausting hours. And they’re wrong to punish staff for their own financial mismanagement of the NHS. Nobody wants to see industrial action but nobody wants junior doctors too exhausted to provide safe patient care either.

I have a simple message for Jeremy Hunt today. Stop the high-handed demands, show you are prepared to compromise and put patient safety ahead of politics. The ball is in his court. He needs to listen to junior doctors and he needs to recognise public concern.

– Labour's shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander i
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BMA: Junior doctor rally will be 'wake-up for ministers'

Junior doctors marched on Downing Street last month in protest over contract change plans. Credit: PA

Dr Johann Malawana,chairman of the British Medical Council's junior doctors' committee, has denied the Health Secretary's accusation it has misled doctors over proposed contract changes.

Ahead of a protest rally, he said it would be "a wake-up call for ministers" that pay and working hours reforms are "unacceptable".

In recent weeks the health secretary has acknowledged junior doctors play a vital role in the NHS, which is at odds with his relentless and extremely damaging rhetoric attacking doctors, which has led to the anger on display today.

We have always stated that without the continued threats of imposition and pre-conditions, the BMA would be happy to enter meaningful negotiations. But until the government gives junior doctors the reasonable assurances they are demanding we will continue with our course of action.

– Dr Johann Malawana, chair of the BMA junior doctors committee
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Junior doctor: Contract changes 'too important' to ignore

Ahead of a march in protest against proposed changes to junior doctor pay and working conditions, an obstetrics and gynaecology registrar has taken to Twitter to explain why "it is too important not to make a noise about".

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Hospital shortlisted for prestigious health award

Southampton’s teaching hospitals have been shortlisted for a prestigious national award which recognises excellence and continuous improvement in healthcare.

University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust provides specialist services across central southern England and the Channel Islands. Among the achievements and innovations noted by the competition’s judges was the performance of Southampton Children’s Hospital, which has some of the best outcomes in the country for pediatric intensive care and children’s heart surgery organisations.

University Hospital Southampton is among seven organisations competing to be named the Health Service Journal’s ‘provider trust of the year'.

NHS acts to make hospital changes after CQC report

Following a recent inspection of Medway Foundation Trust by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) the Trust has asked for support from across the local healthcare system to help them make the improvements needed. Ambulances will be diverted from Medway Maritime Hospital between 7am and midday on Wednesday 16th and Thursday 17th September. Walk-in patients to the A&E department will continue to be seen at the hospital.

Ambulance patients will instead be taken, according to clinical need, to either Maidstone Hospital, Darent Valley Hospital or the Kent and Canterbury Hospital. Some patients including paediatric, cardiac, maternity and abdominal aortic aneurysm will continue to be taken to the Medway Maritime Hospital.

NHS England is working closely alongside the ambulance service and all local NHS hospitals and providers to implement this temporary measure whilst staff at Medway Maritime Hospital continue to work to improve services to patients. We are also working with partners across the healthcare system to put in place further measures to support staff at the hospital. This includes additional training for clinical staff in the emergency department and bringing in experienced clinical staff to work in Medway Maritime’s A&E department which will allow staff time to attend training.

We are also working with local authorities and community health teams to help improve the flow of patients through the hospital. Ensuring the delivery of safe care to patients and the public in Kent and Medway is our absolute priority.

– NHS ENGLAND
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