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Has Weymouth benefited from Olympics legacy?

It's generally believed that staging the Olympic Games can bring prestige and material benefits to the host nation - but is that the reality?

Four years ago the Olympic sailing events were held in Weymouth and the Dorset town was put firmly on the international map. But have the promises of a lasting legacy actually come true? Duncan Sleightholme has been investigating.

Reading diver Chris Mears helps win GB's first diving gold medal at Rio

Chris Mears and Jack Laugher have won GB's first dicing gold medal Credit: PA

Reading's Chris Mears and his partner Jack Laugher have won Great Britain's first Olympic diving gold medal at the Games in Rio.

The pair secured victory in the men's synchronised 3m springboard.

They scored a total of 454.32.

Chris Mears and Jack Laugher celebrate GB's first dicing gold medal Credit: PA
  1. Sarah Saunders

WATCH: Battle is on to make jousting an Olympic sport

It was enjoyed by kings and was a popular sport in the Middle Ages.

And today English Heritage launched a campaign to get jousting recognised as an Olympic sport in the splendid setting of Dover Castle grounds.

It says the strength and equestrian skills required, make it an ideal candidate.

Sarah Saunders spoke to jousters Dominic Sewell and Steve Lawton, and Lucy Hutchings form English Heritage.

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Loss of equipment dashes pole vaulter's hopes

After surgery to his shoulder and a year out, decathlete Ashley Bryant has been training hard at the Thames Valley Athletics Centre in Eton to make sure he can fulfil his lifetime ambition of competing in the Olympics.

But with just two months to go his hopes have been dashed - he failed to qualify following a disappointing pole vault round.

And he says if he doesn't get the call-up it's down to the airline who lost his pole vault poles en-route to the competition. Natalie Boare reports.

Oxford scientists race to stop Zika virus coming to UK

Travellers returning to UK from Rio Olympics can be tested Credit: PA

Researchers in Oxfordshire have developed a test they hope will stop the Zika virus entering the UK.

The test can detect whether someone is infected with the disease, long after other methods cannot. The Oxford-based, Native Antigen Company, are now working on diagnostic kits to screen travellers returning home from the 2016 Rio Olympics.

The Zika virus was declared a ‘public health emergency of international concern’ by The World Health Organisation (WHO) this week.

The Zika virus is transmitted by mosquitos Credit: Patrick Pleul / DPA/PA Images

Our team is now producing to meet the demand for Zika NS1 from our labs at Cherwell Innovation Centre in addition to developing a diagnostic kit for wide-spread use from the summer."

– Dr. Nick Roesen, Chief Scientific Officer and co-founder of The Native Antigen Company
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