Live updates

Advertisement

Oxford University reveals new study on Alzheimer's Disease

New research on Vitamin B Credit: ITV news

Taking B vitamins won't prevent Alzheimer's disease according to researchers at Oxford University. One trial undertaken four years ago showed - for some - it had an effect on the rate of brain shrinkage.

But new clinical trials involving 20,000 people show it doesn't slow mental decline nor is it likely to prevent the disease.Dr Robert Clarke from Oxford University who led the work said: "It would have been nice to have found something different

"Our study draws a line under the debate: B vitamins don't reduce cognitive decline as we age. Taking folic acid and vitamin B-12 is sadly not going to prevent Alzheimer's disease."

He added " It's better to have a balanced diet - eat more fruit and vegetables, avoid too much red meat and too many calories."

The study was funded by the British Heart Foundation, the UK Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK, the UK Food Standards Agency and the Department of Health. The findings are published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

"I was always confident I'd be found innocent"

Video. The former president of Oxford's debating society, Ben Sullivan, told ITV that he was always confident that he would be found innocent after being arrested on rape charges.

Thames Valley Police have now told Ben that he will face no further action, after he was arrested six weeks ago.

Student reputation left "in tatters" after rape allegation

Ben Sullivan Credit: ITV News

The former President of Oxford University's prestigious debating society has told ITV how his reputation was left "in tatters" after he was arrested on rape charges.

Ben Sullivan, who was head of the Oxford Union, has been told by Thames Valley Police that he will not face further action.

After his arrest, a petition was launched for him to step down, and many high-profile speakers boycotted debates.

  1. National

NHS: Statins save 7,000 lives a year in the UK

A 2012 Oxford University study, published in The Lancet medical journal, showed that even very low-risk patients benefited from taking cholesterol-lowering statins.

Rory Collins, professor of medicine at Oxford University, worked on the research and said the number of people who could begin taking statins as a result of the new Nice guidance "would be in the the order" of around five million.

He added: "The evidence is very strong that the treatment is cost-effective at these lower levels. Doctors are now in a position to offer statins on this basis."

He said it was up to individual patients to decide whether they wanted to take statins, based on their risk assessment, but Nice's strategy would "reduce the burden on the health service".

The NHS estimates that statins save 7,000 lives a year in the UK.

Advertisement

  1. National

Millions more people 'to be prescribed statins'

Millions more people in the UK could be prescribed cholesterol-lowering statins in a bid to prevent more cases of heart disease, heart attacks and strokes.

Millions more people in the UK could be prescribed cholesterol-lowering statins, following new guidance. Credit: Press Association

In draft guidance to the NHS, which is subject to consultation, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) has cut the threshold in half for when doctors should consider prescribing the drugs to patients.

Statins are taken by as many as seven million people in the UK but this could rise dramatically - with experts predicting as many as five million more may have them prescribed.

At present, people with a 20 percent risk of developing cardiovascular disease within 10 years are offered statins, but this is being cut to include all people with a 10 percent risk of developing cardiovascular disease within 10 years.

Promising results for trials treating inherited blindness

Patients suffering from an inherited form of blindness have, for the first time, had their vision dramatically improved by gene therapy.

The first six people given experimental injections at the Oxford Eye Hospital were able to see better.

Researchers at the city's university and also at Southampton University say trials have shown promising results for the treatment of Choroideremia.

The Phase I clinical trial is funded by the Health Innovation Challenge Fund, a partnership between the Wellcome Trust and the Department of Health.

University College admits clerical mistake

The leak revealed the names and marks of the undergraduates who achieved the lowest scores in exams taken before Christmas.

The exams are known as 'collections'. They're used to monitor students' progress and do not form part of the final degree mark.

"We can confirm that owing to a clerical error the collection marks of a small number of University College students were accidentally included in an email sent out to students on 13 January. We would like to apologise to all students affected by this inadvertent disclosure for any distress this has caused and reassure them that we are investigating exactly how this happened and are determined to make sure this does not happen again. University College takes the treatment of sensitive data very seriously."

– Dr Anne Knowland, Senior Tutor of University College
Load more updates