Oxford University

Man takes Oxford College to court

A would-be university student is taking an Oxford college to court alleging that it turned him down for a place on financial grounds.

Smoking study

Women smokers can earn themselves 10 years of extra life by quitting the habit before middle age, say scientists.

To be or not to be online?

Stars including Stephen Fry and Vanessa Redgrave are backing a campaign to make the first volume of Shakespeare's plays available online.

Live updates

National

NHS: Statins save 7,000 lives a year in the UK

A 2012 Oxford University study, published in The Lancet medical journal, showed that even very low-risk patients benefited from taking cholesterol-lowering statins.

Rory Collins, professor of medicine at Oxford University, worked on the research and said the number of people who could begin taking statins as a result of the new Nice guidance "would be in the the order" of around five million.

He added: "The evidence is very strong that the treatment is cost-effective at these lower levels. Doctors are now in a position to offer statins on this basis."

He said it was up to individual patients to decide whether they wanted to take statins, based on their risk assessment, but Nice's strategy would "reduce the burden on the health service".

The NHS estimates that statins save 7,000 lives a year in the UK.

National

Millions more people 'to be prescribed statins'

Millions more people in the UK could be prescribed cholesterol-lowering statins in a bid to prevent more cases of heart disease, heart attacks and strokes.

Millions more people in the UK could be prescribed cholesterol-lowering statins, following new guidance. Credit: Press Association

In draft guidance to the NHS, which is subject to consultation, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) has cut the threshold in half for when doctors should consider prescribing the drugs to patients.

Statins are taken by as many as seven million people in the UK but this could rise dramatically - with experts predicting as many as five million more may have them prescribed.

At present, people with a 20 percent risk of developing cardiovascular disease within 10 years are offered statins, but this is being cut to include all people with a 10 percent risk of developing cardiovascular disease within 10 years.

Advertisement

Promising results for trials treating inherited blindness

Patients suffering from an inherited form of blindness have, for the first time, had their vision dramatically improved by gene therapy.

The first six people given experimental injections at the Oxford Eye Hospital were able to see better.

Researchers at the city's university and also at Southampton University say trials have shown promising results for the treatment of Choroideremia.

The Phase I clinical trial is funded by the Health Innovation Challenge Fund, a partnership between the Wellcome Trust and the Department of Health.

University College admits clerical mistake

The leak revealed the names and marks of the undergraduates who achieved the lowest scores in exams taken before Christmas.

The exams are known as 'collections'. They're used to monitor students' progress and do not form part of the final degree mark.

"We can confirm that owing to a clerical error the collection marks of a small number of University College students were accidentally included in an email sent out to students on 13 January. We would like to apologise to all students affected by this inadvertent disclosure for any distress this has caused and reassure them that we are investigating exactly how this happened and are determined to make sure this does not happen again. University College takes the treatment of sensitive data very seriously."

– Dr Anne Knowland, Senior Tutor of University College

University will 'discipline' flame thrower student

The student who showed up to a fancy dress party with his own flame thrower will be 'disciplined' according to the Dean of Christ Church.

The Very Reverend Christopher Lewis had this to say:

I understand there was an incident in the main quad at Christ Church outside the end-of-term party on Saturday. The college is investigating and the student concerned will be disciplined.

– The Very Reverend Christopher Lewis, Dean of Christ Church

Advertisement

Student turns up to party with his own flame thrower

Officials at Oxford university had to close a party down when a student turned up with his home made flame thrower.

Inigo Lapwood, 20, said he made the weapon using parts from a nail gun and diesel engine glow plug and a canister of butane gas.

Student Inigo Lapwood with his home-made weapon Credit: South West News Service

The Christ Church annual event was a fancy dress party, with Mr Lapwood dressing up as the rock band Arcade Fire.

The college is planning on punishing the student, who is in his second year studying philosophy and psychology.

National

Soft drinks tax 'could earn Treasury £275m'

Health experts who have called for a 20% tax on sugary soft drinks say the move could raise more than £275 million each year for the treasury - around 8 pence per person, per week.

This saving "could be used to increase NHS funding during a period of budget restrictions or to subsidise foods with health benefits, such as fruit and vegetables," researchers from Oxford and Reading universities said.

Read: Sugary drinks tax 'would impact overweight young'

National

Taxing sugary soft drinks 'undemocratic'

Calls for a 20% tax hike on fizzy drinks have been met with skepticism by Cambridge University clinical biochemistry and medicine professor Sir Stephen O'Rahilly.

Whilst any effective discouragement to the ingestion of sugary beverages would likely have a health benefit on society, taxation of specific foods is likely to be currently politically undeliverable in most democracies.

A workable alternative might be to encourage the major companies to switch to the aggressive promotion and marketing of less harmful versions of their products.

– Sir Stephen O'Rahilly, Cambride University

Read: Fizzy drinks tax 'would reduce obesity'

Load more updates

Advertisement

Today's top stories