Oxford University

Man takes Oxford College to court

A would-be university student is taking an Oxford college to court alleging that it turned him down for a place on financial grounds.

Smoking study

Women smokers can earn themselves 10 years of extra life by quitting the habit before middle age, say scientists.

To be or not to be online?

Stars including Stephen Fry and Vanessa Redgrave are backing a campaign to make the first volume of Shakespeare's plays available online.

Live updates

Student turns up to party with his own flame thrower

Officials at Oxford university had to close a party down when a student turned up with his home made flame thrower.

Inigo Lapwood, 20, said he made the weapon using parts from a nail gun and diesel engine glow plug and a canister of butane gas.

Student Inigo Lapwood with his home-made weapon Credit: South West News Service

The Christ Church annual event was a fancy dress party, with Mr Lapwood dressing up as the rock band Arcade Fire.

The college is planning on punishing the student, who is in his second year studying philosophy and psychology.

Advertisement

National

Soft drinks tax 'could earn Treasury £275m'

Health experts who have called for a 20% tax on sugary soft drinks say the move could raise more than £275 million each year for the treasury - around 8 pence per person, per week.

This saving "could be used to increase NHS funding during a period of budget restrictions or to subsidise foods with health benefits, such as fruit and vegetables," researchers from Oxford and Reading universities said.

Read: Sugary drinks tax 'would impact overweight young'

National

Taxing sugary soft drinks 'undemocratic'

Calls for a 20% tax hike on fizzy drinks have been met with skepticism by Cambridge University clinical biochemistry and medicine professor Sir Stephen O'Rahilly.

Whilst any effective discouragement to the ingestion of sugary beverages would likely have a health benefit on society, taxation of specific foods is likely to be currently politically undeliverable in most democracies.

A workable alternative might be to encourage the major companies to switch to the aggressive promotion and marketing of less harmful versions of their products.

– Sir Stephen O'Rahilly, Cambride University

Read: Fizzy drinks tax 'would reduce obesity'

National

Sugary drinks tax 'would impact overweight young'

Doctors who have called on the Government to introduce a 20% tax on sugary drinks say 16 to 29-year-olds consume the most sugary drinks - an average of 300ml per day, compared to 60ml among those aged over 50.

Younger adults and children consume much greater quantities of sugary drinks.

This is a concern for their health, not only in terms of diabetes and obesity, but also tooth decay.

Our work suggests that a sugary drinks tax would have a much greater impact in terms of reducing obesity in younger adults.

– Dr Oliver Mytton, Oxford University
National

Fizzy drinks tax 'would reduce obesity'

A 20% tax on sugary drinks would cut the number of overweight people in the UK by 285,000 over 10 years, according to experts from Oxford and Reading universities.

A 20% sugary drink tax would cut the number of overweight or obese people in the UK by 285,000, researchers say.
A 20% sugary drink tax would cut the number of overweight or obese people in the UK by 285,000, researchers say. Credit: PA

A tax on the drinks, which the researchers say are linked to "ill health" and have "no beneficial nutrients", could reduce cut the number of people who are obese by 180,000 alone, according to the findings printed in British Medical Journal .

Read: Call for tax on sugary soft drinks

Advertisement

Finding terrorists and criminals through face recognition

We are all programmed to recognise faces and download vital information about a person's identity, gender and personality. But we all make mistakes. Now new research at the Universities of Surrey and Oxford is making face recognition by computer deadly accurate.

In fact, their work is becoming an important tool in the hunt for terrorists and criminals. Fred joined PhD student Paul Koppen for a photo session.

Oxford science research leads to new drug

A new drug has been approved by the European Medicines Agency which could offer better treatment to patients with multiple sclerosis. Alemtuzumab will give people who have the disease the chance to live without the side effects for much longer.

Symptoms of the disease can include loss of physical skills, sensation, vision and bladder control.

Professor Herman Waldmann was involved in the early discovery work of the antibody drug called Campath-1H at Cambridge University. It was originally used to treat leukaemia. He continued to study the drug for two decades while at Oxford University.

Load more updates

Advertisement

Today's top stories