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Police looking for man who is wanted for recall to jail

Dean Kiely is wanted by Sussex Police as he has breached the conditions of his prison release licence Credit: Sussex Police

A Brighton man is wanted by police to return to prison.

Dean Kiely has breached the conditions of his prison release licence.

He had been served a prison sentence for disqualified driving and handling stolen goods in September last year.

Kiely is described as white, 5'11" and is of proportionate build.

He has a scar on his nose to the right of his cheek as well as another scar on his forehead.

A Sussex Police spokesperson said, "Kiely comes from Brighton but also has links to Sutton in South London."

Police hunt for man wanted for recall to prison

Police in Brighton are seeking 33-year old local man Gareth Jamieson, who is wanted for recall to prison. Jamieson is described as white, 5'10",of heavy build, with brown eyes, brown hair and is believed to have a beard.

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Gareth Jamieson is wanted for recall to prison Credit: Sussex Police

He was sentenced to 18 months imprisonment for possessing an offensive weapon in August 2013 and was released on license in March this year. However he was recalled to prison soon afterwards for failing to attend his appointments with his supervising Probation Officer.

Jamieson is not thought to pose a direct threat to the general public but anyone who sees him should dial 999.

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Man jailed for possessing indecent images

A man who downloaded thousands of images of children being sexually abused has been sent to prison. Nicholas Lorimer, 30 years-old, of High Street, Herne Bay, was arrested after officers executed a warrant at his former address in Shalloak Road, Canterbury, in November 2012.

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Nicholas Lorimer was sentenced to two years in prison Credit: Kent Police

A number of hard drives and computers were seized from Lorimer - who later changed his name by deed poll to John Conner – and he was released on bail while the items were examined.

Over 6,000 images ranging from levels 1 – 5 were found to be stored on the devices, as well as a number of movies.

776 of the images and movies were being held with a view to distributing them to others. Computer examiners also found 24 images that were graded as extreme, and 63 that were considered prohibited.

Lorimer pleaded guilty to 14 charges relating to indecent images of children.

Lorimer was sentenced at Canterbury Crown Court on 4 March to two years in prison.

He was also given a 10-year sex offender prevention order and must sign the sex offender register.

Winchester MP on committee for prison vote debate

A Winchester MP is in the middle of the highly charged debate around whether prisoners should be allowed to vote.

Steve Brine has sat on a special joint committee in charge of looking at a bill regarding the prisoners' voting rights.

The committee have published their report reflecting the complex issue which split the members and means prisoners sentenced for less than 12 months will be able to vote.

In scrutinising the draft Bill, the Committee has been examining two separate issues: whether prisoners serving a custodial sentence should be allowed to vote; and the conflict between the European Court of Human Rights, the sovereignty of Parliament and the expressed views of the House of Commons which, in February 2011, placed itself firmly against extending the franchise to serving prisoners."

– Steve Brine, Winchester & Chandler’s Ford MP

Last inmates leave Reading Prison

It's stood in the centre of Reading for almost 170 years housing thousands of prisoners, most famously, Oscar Wilde, but today the final inmates left Reading Prison.

Now a young offenders institute, the prison on Forbury Road can hold up to 320 men up to the age of 26.

But two months ago the Government said it was no longer fit for purpose and will close.

Today's shut-down has come a month early - and is a complete mistake according to the prison officers union.

Mel Bloor reports.

(Interviewees: Rob Wilson MP, Reading East, Conservative and Steve Gillan, Prison Officers Association General Secretary.)

Reading prison closing today, a month early

Reading prison is to close today, a month earlier than planned.

It is one of four prisons shutting under government plans to replace them with a super-prison.

The last of the 320 inmates at the Berkshire jail will be leaving later today.

The Prison Service said it was aiming to avoid compulsory redundancies by redeploying staff or offering voluntary early departures.

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Swindon drugs gang jailed

Gang leader Fatos Hamzaraj was sentenced to 12 years imprisonment
Gugliemo Rossi was sentenced to 6 years in prison
Paul Boulton was sentenced to 8 years in jail

Four other men were also sentenced for drug offences in 2011 in connection with the seven-man gang.

Wiltshire Police have confirmed the estimated street value of the drugs at £250,000. After testing the cocaine seized, it was found to have a 97% purity so the figure could be significantly higher.

Michael Crossley was sentenced to 4 years imprisonment
Christopher Peter Hemming was jailed for 6 years
Paul Matthew Bunney was sentenced to 20 months imprisonment
Jack Bowen Jones was sentenced to 3 years in jail

Prison praised for 'major improvements' after riots

Riots at Ford open prison
There were riots at HMP Ford in 2011

Prison inspectors have praised staff at a jail in Sussex for making major improvements after riots in 2011.

Officers found that the relationship between detainees and guards at Ford open prison has greatly improved. However they also found some single cells used for two prisoners were too small.

The jail holds 500 male inmates. Publishing the report of an announced inspection of the open prison, Nick Hardwick - the Chief Inspector of Prisons said:

"Managers and staff at Ford are to be congratulated on turning round the prison after deep-seated concerns were exposed by a serious disturbance.

"This is still work in progress but HMP Ford now compares well with other open prisons. Overall, it provides a safe and decent environment, where prisoners are kept busy with good quality activity.

"Work to help prisoners resettle successfully after they are released and reduce the risk that they will reoffend has also improved, but these remain the areas where most still requires to be done."

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