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Prostate Cancer campaign launched

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men - with 112 people being diagnosed every single day.

Survival rates have improved dramatically in the past 20 years - but it's still the biggest killer after lung cancer - mainly because people catch it too late.

Now a campaign is being launched to persuade people to talk - to overcome the embarrassment and be more open about the disease

It's called "Men United v Prostate Cancer" to appeal to male instincts and it's hoped a new and open approach will improve the chances of survival.

David Wood has been speaking to Kenneth Jeffers, a cancer patient from Herne Bay, the comedian Bill Bailey and Owen Sharp from Prostate Cancer UK.

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  1. National

Prostate cancer survivors spark inspiration for film

A new film with an all-star cast is aiming to raise awareness of prostate cancer by telling the story of a cancer support group.

The inspiration behind the film comes from members of a real support group - one of many across the country - who meet in north London to speak about their experiences.

Between them they hope to encourage more men to talk openly about a disease that one in eight of all men will be diagnosed with at some point in their lives.

ITV News correspondent Lewis Vaughan Jones went to meet them:

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  1. Tom Savvides

Former policeman on how his family urged him to get tested for prostate cancer - and saved his life

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, but many are reluctant to seek help. ITV and Prostate Cancer UK are aiming to change that with a new campaign called Stand By Your Man.

The awareness campaign is encouraging men and their partners to spot the signs and to seek prompt treatment. Tom Savvides reports on how raising awareness can save lives.

The report is followed by an interview with Meg Burgess, a nurse from Prostate Cancer UK.

  1. National

Campaign is real 'opportunity' to get men talking

The CEO of Prostate Cancer UK has said the Stand By Your Man campaign is a "real opportunity" to get men and their loved ones talking about prostate cancer.

Owen Sharp, who praised the "incredible" cast list involved in the Fathers Day film, said:

"We know we are starting to raise awareness but we know we have so much further to go.

"The whole idea behind it is to get conversations going around every kitchen table, round every journey in every car or any other time people are talking about things."

  1. National

Film aimed at those 'not being reached' by campaigns

Martin Sadofski, who wrote the film Fathers Day, said it was important to reach an audience who were not usually reached by campaigns in order to raise awareness of prostate cancer.

The screenwriter, who was delighted with the A-list cast who starred in the film, said:

"The nice thing about it was to go for an audience that wouldn't normally read about prostate cancer so we wanted to go for the kind of guys that like football, watch blockbuster action films the guy on the building site, the taxi driver.

"It was important for us to reach an audience that weren't being reached."

  1. National

Men are 'unaware' of the dangers of prostate cancer

Former footballer Mark Bright has warned that men are unaware of the dangers of prostate cancer.

Mr Bright said the recent campaign was trying to spread awareness and urged men around the age of 50 to go and get checked.

The former Crystal Palace player cited football as a way of spreading awareness:

"I just feel that football, which is predominantly a male crowd, and that's a great sort of area to target and to get the word out there."

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