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Bodies returned after helicopter crash

The bodies of three of the four oil workers who died when a helicopter plunged into the North Sea have been brought back to the mainland.

A passenger ferry carrying the bodies arrived at Aberdeen Harbour at 7am this morning.

It is understood that the fourth body will arrive tomorrow.

The Super Puma was carrying 16 passengers and two crew from the Borgsten Dolphin platform when it crashed into the sea off Shetland on Friday evening, killing three men and one woman.

It is not yet known what caused the CHC-operated helicopter to crash into the sea.

Tributes have been paid to the victims, named as Duncan Munro, 46, from Bishop Auckland, County Durham; George Allison, 57, from Winchester, Hampshire; Sarah Darnley, 45, from Elgin in the Highlands; and 59-year-old Gary McCrossan, from Inverness.

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'Skill' of helicopter pilots 'helped save lives' in crash

Experts believe more people could have died, after a helicopter ditched into the North Sea killing four people, but added that the "skill of the pilots" played a part in saving lives, according to the British Airline Pilots Association.

Helicopter's yellow floatation device is visable as RNLI volunteers in the Y-boat from the Aith lifeboat inspect the wreckage. Credit: RNLI

Speaking to The Daily Telegraph, a spokesman said: "It is too early to say exactly what happened, but ditching a helicopter on water is extremely difficult.

"The skill of the pilots in dealing with what looks to have been a catastrophic power failure at low altitude almost certainly ensured that more people didn't lose their lives."

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Experts hope helicopter black box reveal cause of crash

Investigators will try to establish what caused a helicopter to plunge into the North Sea, killing four oil workers, after the wreckage was recovered from the water.

Misty conditions last night hampered efforts to salvage the wreckage of the Super Puma and transport it back to shore for examination by a team from the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB).

It is understood that the remains of the Super Puma AS332 L2 were eventually lifted on to the deck of the vessel Bibby Polaris which was due to travel to a mainland port.

It is hoped information on the helicopter's black box recorder will help establish the cause of the crash.

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Emergency meeting into fatal Shetland helicopter crash

An emergency meeting of gas and oil companies will be held tomorrow in the wake of

Friday's deadly helicopter crash off the coast of Shetland, which killed four oil workers.

The entire UK fleet of the commercial Super Puma aircraft has been grounded following the tragedy amid a growing backlash against the aircraft.

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Shetland helicopter wreckage being brought ashore

The wreckage from the helicopter crash in the Shetlands is being brought ashore for inspection by a team from the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB).

Shetland coastguard manager John Webster earlier said:

The heavy-lift ship is out at the moment trying to recover what wreckage it can from the sea. After that the Air Accidents Investigation Branch will decide where to take it.

A lot of our crew are shocked, to say the least. We've dealt with a few air crashes before. Each one is different but each is as sad as the last.

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Helicopter victim was experienced rig worker

The Hampshire man killed in a helicopter crash in the North Sea was an experienced offshore rig worker. George Allison, 57, from Winchester, was one of four people who died after a Super Puma L2 aircraft went down at 6.20pm last night, around two miles west of Sumburgh airport on Shetland.

Mr Allison had been working at the Offshore Dunbar Platform as a project safety supervisor for just over a year when he was killed, according to his LinkedIn profile. He was overseeing conversion work at the platform and at a drilling support vessel, it said.

Describing himself as a "highly qualified, experienced and competent Safety Advisor who has been working in an offshore environment globally for the past 27 years", he said he was highly motivated, hard working and creative. He listed his interests as swimming, fishing, art and riding his bicycle.

Photo released of Hampshire crash victim

George Allison Credit: Police Scotland

Police Scotland have released a photo of George Allison, 57, from Winchester, who was killed in a helicopter crash in the North Sea last night. Three other people also died after the Super Puma L2 aircraft went down at 6.20pm, around two miles west of Sumburgh airport on Shetland.

The aircraft was carrying 16 workers and two crew members at the time when it was believed to have experienced a "catastrophic" loss of power. Assistant Chief Constable Malcolm Graham from Police Scotland said: 'Our sympathies are very much with the families of those affected at this difficult time.

'This incident has resulted in a large-scale response from a number of different agencies who have worked closely together to deliver a swift rescue operation.We will now be carrying out an investigation to establish the circumstances in due course.'

Hampshire man killed in North Sea crash

The helicopter crashed two miles west from Sumburgh airport on Shetland Credit: Press Association Images

A Hampshire man has been named among four people killed in a helicopter crash near Shetland. George Allison, 57, from Winchester, Duncan Munro, 46, from Bishop Auckland, Sarah Darnley, 45, from Elgin, and 59-year-old Gary McCrossan, from Inverness, died following the incident yesterday evening.

The Super Puma L2 aircraft went down at 6.20pm, around two miles west of Sumburgh airport on Shetland as it was returning to the island from the Borgsten Dolphin platform.

The aircraft was carrying 16 workers and two crew members at the time of the incident, in which it was believed to have experienced a "catastrophic" loss of power. Fourteen people were taken to safety during the immediate rescue response.