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Life sentence for burglar who killed homeowner

A man has been jailed for life after being found guilty of murdering a pensioner at his home in Kent .

Roy Blackman, 73, was battered to death while trying to protect his property at Biddenden from a gang of burglars.

Mark Love has been told he will serve a minimum of 28 years in jail.

He was also found guilty of playing a part in another violent burglary in which champion marksman George Digweed was beaten around the head.

Kent Police said the hunt for the rest of the gang - and for missing cash from the two raids - will continue.

We speak to Mr Digweed and include tributes from Mr Blackman's friends and work colleagues shortly after the attack.

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'Our ambulance have 400,000 miles on the clock' - special measures for scandal-hit Ambulance Trust

Delayed ambulances and not answering 999 calls quick enough - just two of the reasons a scandal-hit ambulance trust has been put into special measures.

A damning report into the South East Coast Ambulance Service (Secamb) - which covers Sussex, Surrey and North-East Hampshire - also found other serious concerns, including:

- Response times not meeting national targets.

- Patients giving up on calls for help, especially on weekends.

- Not enough staff, impacting on performance and fatigue.

- A culture of harassment and bullying of staff.

So what now for the troubled trust?

Andy Dickenson speaks to Ben Williams, Geraint Davies, acting chief executive of Secamb, Alan Thorne of the Care Quality Commission, David Liley of Healthwatch, and Nigel Sweet from Unison.

Train drivers were 'so tired' they passed signals at danger

Two train drivers were so tired - or "so fatigued" - that they passed signals at danger, at a junction to the west of Reading Station.

The Rail Accident Investigation Branch said both incidents happened because the drivers had not had enough sleep and, therefore, were unable to properly control the trains.

This was, in part, due to the rest facilities at Acton not being 'fit for purpose', and because the drivers were nearing the end of a long night shift.

Train signs at red Credit: PA Images

The first incident happened at 0822 on 28th March 2015, when a freight train running from Acton to Westbury, operated by DB Schenker Rail (UK), passed a signal at danger at Reading Westbury Line Junction.

A similar incident occurred at 06:11 hrs on 3 November 2015 when another freight train, forming the same service from Acton to Westbury, and operated by the same company, passed a signal at danger at Ruscombe Junction, about seven miles east of Reading.

RAIB began an investigation into both of these incidents following the latter event at Ruscombe Junction, owing to the similarities between them.

"Both incidents occurred because the train drivers involved were too fatigued to properly control their trains; both drivers stated that they momentarily fell asleep on the approach to the signals concerned.

"Neither driver reported as unfit for duty, which was also causal to the incidents. The investigation identified underlying factors associated with supervision and management at the drivers’ home depot in Westbury, and with the general approach to the management of fatigue within the company."

– Rail Accident Investigation Branch

As a result of this investigation, RAIB has made three recommendations covering shift planning at Westbury depot, managing people who may be suffering from tiredness, or identifying them, and look at the risk of fatigue.

RAIB has also identified two learning points concerning the importance of preparing for duty and reporting fatigue, and the role of napping (and facilities for such) within a fatigue risk management system.

Simon French, Chief Inspector of Rail Accidents said: "An admission of tiredness should not be seen as a weakness - it may be the unavoidable consequence of the work and home demands placed on a driver.

"This report has highlighted the ‘real-world’ experience of freight train drivers. By necessity, many freight trains must operate at night and many drivers are required to work long and irregular shifts, often during night hours.

"This means that drivers must accommodate their sleep, home responsibilities, social life and commuting in the hours that remain – and this can be a challenge. For this reason I urge freight operating companies, their employees and trade unions to work together to find practical ways of reducing fatigue at work."

Ambulance boss says improvements underway at troubled service

The acting Chief Executive of the troubled South East Coast Ambulance Service say work is already underway to improve.

The service has been heavily criticised - and put in 'special measures' - after deliberately delaying thousands of 111 calls. Thousands of patients were subject to delays as a result.

Here's acting Chief Executive Geraint Davies:

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