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Back to nature - fundraisers prepare to bare all

Sumatran Tigers are currently an endangered species Credit: ITV Meridian

Staff at a big cat sanctuary in Kent are preparing to bare all to raise money for Sumatran tigers.

Head Keeper Beccy Porter and five other brave souls from the Wildlife Heritage Foundation in Smarden are planning join 300 others to run naked around London Zoo wearing just a pair of tiger ears.

It's part of a challenge to win £5000 in a charity competition. They came up with the idea because a group of tigers is called a 'streak'.

At the moment they're in third place, but they need more people to vote for them before Tuesday. If they're successful they'll put the money towards refurbishing the tiger ponds. Sumatran tigers are an endangered species.

Endangered tigers enjoy Christmas presents at Kent park

Tigers at Port Lympne enjoy a selection of Christmas presents Credit: Port Lympne

Tigers at Port Lympne Animal Park have been enjoying Christmas presents as such of an enrichment scheme.

The Amur tigers get to enjoy festively decorated boxes, sprayed with an array of fragrances.

The tigers dug into the presents eagerly by ripping them open and rubbing against them.

Tigers at the park will enjoy their presents today Credit: Port Lympne

Providing tigers with new scents excites their sense of smell and is important to create a simulating environment for the animals.

Ben Thompson, Large Carnivore keeper said: "Seeing the tigers interact with new scents is really important. It stimulates their natural behaviour, such as the flehmen reaction (where they expose their tongues to transfer scents to the vomeronasal organ in their mouth)

"They enjoy rubbing against the scent and scent marking over the top themselves. They particularly enjoy Calvin Klein’s Obsession For Men!”

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Golden tiger skull focus of major exhibition

Gilded Tiger 2063 Credit: Martin Hayward-Harris

A replica of a tiger skull gilded in 23.5 carat gold is to be the main centrepiece of the Wildlife Artist of the Year exhibition.

The wooden sculpture by Oxfordshire artist Martin Hayward-Harris is shortlisted for the 2013 award.

The skull is based upon a real tiger skull stored at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History.

Noble names for rare tiger cubs

Ronja and baby at Smarden's Big Cat Sanctuary Credit: Wildlife Heritage Foundation

Three rare Amur tiger cubs, born at the Wildlife Heritage Foundation in Kent, have been named. The cubs are called Aleena (meaning noble one), Amasia (a future supercontinent of America and Asia) and Siberia (in Northern Russia). The babies were born to mum Ronja and dad Pan in June.

Tiger tiger, burning bright....just checking your molar, bottom right

Most of us hate going to the dentist - but one patient on the Isle of Wight had to be knocked out today before she could get her teeth checked.

Well there was good reason because it wasn't a person but a tiger. Aysha - who was hand reared at The Isle of Wight Zoo - was under for over two and a half hours while she had some root canal treatment and an X-ray.

In the wild, like other big cats, tigers only survive as long as their teeth let them continue to hunt - so as they get older they tend have them checked if they're in captivity.

It was a tense operation for those involved incase she woke up early and got frightened - but we are pleased to say all went well and she's come round and is recovering.

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The tigers who came for tea

Raika tucks in Credit: ITV Meridian

The first pictures have been released of two rare Sumatran tigers settling in at their new home at the Wildlife Heritage Foundation tucked away in the tiny hamlet of Smarden in Kent.

Raika and Lumpur were moved from London Zoo to the big cat sanctuary, after 15 years of living there.

Raika was born in Berlin in 1995 and Lumpur was born in France in 1997.

The pair have been together for many years, but despite much coaxing, haven't managed to breed.

Sumatran tigers are a critically endangered species which come from Indonesia, and are at threat from poachers and a decline in their natural habitat.

They can swim up to 6 miles and their roar can be heard more than a mile away.

Raika and Lumpur getting to know their new surroundings Credit: ITV Meridian

Let's hear it for the girls! Tiger cubs on camera in Kent

The Wildlife Heritage Foundation in Kent has released the first footage of its ten week old female tiger cubs.

The cubs were born to proud Mum Ronja, an Amur Tiger, at the conservation charity's headquarters in Smarden.

Members of the public will be able to see them, and other animals, when the charity opens its doors for a special open day and concert at the end of September.