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Titanic biscuit could be sold for £10,000 at auction

The biscuit was found in a Titanic lifeboat Credit: Henry Aldridge

The world's most valuable biscuit is to be sold at auction in Wiltshire. It could fetch up to £10,000.

The Spillers and Bakers 'Pilot' biscuit survived the sinking of the Titanic in 1912. The biscuit was part of a survival kit stored within one of the lifeboats and was kept as a souvenir.

It will go under the hammer at Henry Aldridge & Son auctioneers in Devizes, Wiltshire on 24 October.

The biscuit was kept by a passenger on board the SS Carpathia which went to the aid of survivors from Titanic.

He put the biscuit in an envelope with a note, saying the snack was from Titanic.

Titanic letter to go under the hammer

This letter from the owners of the Titanic will be sold at auction Credit: Henry Aldridge & Son

A letter from the owners of the Titanic to the family of an officer who died when the ship sunk, is to be sold at auction in Wiltshire.

It asks for money to return the body of James Moody, to England.

He was on watch when the ship struck the iceberg. However his remains were never found.

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Titanic letter up for auction in Wiltshire

Up for auction Credit: Henry Aldridge and Sons

A letter which details the Titanic's near miss in Southampton is being sold at auction in Wiltshire. The ship's chief engineer Joseph Bell wrote the letter about the incident which took place shortly before the ship's ill-fated voyage to New York. It's going under the hammer at Henry Aldridge and Sons in Devizes.

It was the worst of omens for the gleaming new ship embarking on its maiden voyage. As the Titanic left Southampton docks for a journey that has gone down in history, the ship came close to hitting two other liners.
Had they collided, it would have cut short the Titanic's ill-fated voyage to New York and may well have averted the catastrophe that was to claim 1,500 lives when the boat struck an iceberg on April 14 1912. The near miss is described in a letter from the Titanic's chief engineer Joseph Bell to his son Frank.

Mr Bell, who died in the disaster leaving behind wife Maud and four children, had transferred to the Titanic from the Olympic and oversaw its construction in Belfast.

Mr Bell's letter is estimated to fetch between £10,000 and £15,000 when it goes under the hammer on October 18.

Only surviving Titanic letter sells for £119,000

The letter, written on Titanic stationery, was written by second class passenger Esther Hart Credit: Henry Aldridge and Son/PA Wire

The last letter known to be written on the ill-fated Titanic sold for a world record £119,000 at auction today.

The letter was penned by second class passenger Esther Hart just hours before the liner struck an iceberg on Sunday April 14, 1912.

The £119,000 price tag shattered the previous record for a Titanic-related letter, which had stood at £94,000, auctioneers said. The letter, headed On board 'Titanic' and written on Titanic stationery, comescomplete with an envelope embossed with the White Star Line flag.

Last letter written before Titanic strikes iceberg

The letter, written on Titanic stationery, was written by second class passenger Esther Hart Credit: Henry Aldridge and Son/PA Wire
The letter, headed On board 'Titanic', comes complete with an envelope embossed with the White Star Line flag. Credit: Henry Aldridge and Son/PA Wire
The letter was due to be delivered to Mrs Hart's mother in Essex. Credit: Henry Aldridge and Son/PA Wire

1,500 passengers and crew lost their lives in the tragedy, including Mrs Hart's husband Benjamin. The letter, headed On board 'Titanic', comes complete with an envelope embossed with the White Star Line flag. The items will go under the hammer at Henry Aldridge & Son Auctioneers in Devizes, Wilts.

In the letter Mrs Hart, who was travelling with her daughter and well-known survivor Eva Hart, talks about being ill while on board the New York-bound liner.

Mrs Hart writes: "My Dear ones all. As you see it is Sunday afternoon and we are resting in the library after luncheon. I was very bad all day yesterday could not eat or drink and sick all the while, but today I have got over it."

She goes on to describe how she had been to a church service with Eva and to talk about the trip so far.

"Tho they say this Ship does not roll on account of its size. Any how it rolls enough for me, I shall never forget it. It is very nice weather but awfully windy and cold ...

.. They say we may get into New York Tuesday night but we are really due early Wednesday morning, shall write as soon as we get there", she writes.

The letter was due to be delivered to Mrs Hart's mother in Essex when the ship returned to Southampton, but the tragedy meant it was never sent. Mrs Hart and Eva were among those rescued by HMS Carpathia.

A biography by Eva Hart, which is also due to go under the hammer alongside the letter, recalls the moment her mother later found the letter in the pocket of her husband's coat.

Andrew Aldridge, from Henry Aldridge and Son Auctioneers, said the letter was expected to fetch between £80,000 and £100,000.

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