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'Dry January' alcohol abstinence has year-round benefits

University of Sussex research shows that giving up alcohol during January leads to a reduction in harmful drinking for the rest of the year.

'Dry January' alcohol abstinence has year-round benefits

'Dry January' participants reported losing weight, sleeping better and saving money Credit: PA

Giving up alcohol during January leads to a reduction in harmful drinking for the rest of the year, according to research by the University of Sussex.

People taking part in Alcohol Concern's 'Dry January' campaign drink alcohol less regularly and don't get as drunk after taking part in the month-long abstinence.

Health expert Dr. Richard de Visser found that six months after giving up booze as part of the campaign, 72% of participants had maintained lower levels of harmful drinking.

Nearly four-fifths reported that they had saved money thanks to 'Dry January' and almost half say they had lost weight. 62% found that they were sleeping better after a month without alcohol.

National charity Alcohol Concern says that 9.6 million people in England drink more than the recommended daily limit.

"What's really interesting is that these changes in alcohol consumption were also seen in the participants who didn't complete the whole month alcohol free"

– Dr Richard de Visser, University of Sussex

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