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Obama criticises Sony for 'caving in to censorship'

US President Barak Obama has poured scorn on North Korea as the FBI confirmed the dictatorship had hacked Sony pictures after it produced a satire on an assassination attempt on the life of Kim Jong-un.

Mr Obama said the hacking was 'dangerous folly' which threatened America's commercial interests and worse.

ITV News' Washington Correspondent Robert Moore reports.

Sony 'looking for alternative platform to release The Interview'

Sony Pictures Entertainment said it immediately began looking for alternative platforms to release The Interview after it shelved the planned Christmas Day opening when cinema chains bailed on the comedy film.

Seth Rogen and James Franco in The Interview. Credit: Sony Pictures UK

"It is still our hope that anyone who wants to see this movie will get the opportunity to do so," Sony said in a statement after President Barack Obama criticized the studio for pulling the comedy at the center of a cyber attack blamed on North Korea.

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Sony CEO responds to Obama: 'We did not make a mistake'

The head of Sony Pictures has rejected US President Barack Obama's claim the company "made a mistake" by pulling the release of The Interview in the face of terrorist threats.

Michael Lynton said Barack Obama was mistaken in his reading of the film's cancellation. Credit: REUTERS/Toru Hanai

Speaking to CNN, Michael Lynton said Sony did not "give in" to hackers and said Mr Obama, along with the press and public, were "mistaken" over their reading of what prompted them to cancel the film's screenings.

Mr Lynton said Sony "had no alternative" after experiencing "the worst cyber attack in American history".

Obama says 'I love Seth Rogen' as he ridicules North Korea

US President Barack Obama has ridiculed North Korea for mounting an "all-out assault on a movie studio because of a satirical movie starring Seth Rogen and James Franco".

An FBI investigation has concluded Pyongyang was behind the cyber attack last month on Sony Pictures.

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Obama: Sony 'made a mistake' in pulling film after hacking

US President Barack Obama has said Sony Pictures "made a mistake" in cancelling the release of movie The Interview after threats from hackers who breached the film company's security system.

President Obama said the US will make a proportionate response to North Korea in the future as he blamed Pyongyang for making considerable damage with the cyber attack.

"I wish they had spoken to me first," Mr Obama said while taking questions at the White House.

"I would have told them: 'Do not get into a pattern in which you are intimidated by these kinds of criminal attacks.'"

Mr Obama said the US would make a "proportionate response" to North Korea "when we choose" after the FBI blamed Pyongyang for the cyber attack on Sony's computer systems.

He confirmed the US had no indication North Korea worked with any other nation in conducting the cyber attack.

FBI: North Korean government committed Sony hacking

The FBI said it has enough information to conclude the North Korean government is responsible for the hacking of Sony Pictures and is "deeply concerned" by the "destructive nature" of the attack.

The agency said there is a "significant overlap" between the systems used in the Sony breach and other cyber attacks linked to North Korea, including an assault on South Korea's banks and media in 2013.

The computers of Sony Pictures were breached by hackers ahead of its release of The Interview, a film about the assassination of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Credit: Reuters

The FBI announcement came after a US official, speaking anonymously, said the probe into the hacking had also identified a possible link to China - either through host servers or use of actors.

The Chinese Embassy in Washington said China does not support "cyber illegalities" committed on its soil and called on the US to share its evidence to support the claims.

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