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Vehicle tax will be enforced 'from electronic records'

A spokesman for the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency has said that changes to the rules of tax discs will not affect the agency's ability to enforce the law:

There is absolutely no basis to these figures and it is nonsense to suggest that getting rid of the tax disc will lead to an increase in vehicle tax evasion.

We have a proven track record in making vehicle tax easy to pay but hard to avoid, with over 99% of all vehicles taxed. Given the systems now in place we take enforcement action direct from our electronic records rather than requiring a tax disc.

– spokesman, Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency

'Clear concern' among motorists over tax disc changes

The chief engineer for RAC has said that a survey shows there is "clearly concern among motorists about forthcoming changes to tax disc rules:

There is clearly concern among motorists over the issue of enforcement. Most of the changes make sense and will benefit the motorist, but too many motorists are unaware of the detail.

The big question has to be whether enforcement using only cameras and automatic number plate recognition will be sufficiently effective.

– David Bizley, RAC chief engineer

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Poll: 63% of drivers expect rise in number of untaxed cars

An RAC survey of more than 2,000 drivers showed that almost two-thirds of respondents believe changes to the rules on tax discs would prompt more tax evasion.

  • 36% were unaware of the scrapping of the paper disc
  • 47% did not know when the change was due to take effect
  • 63% feared there would be a rise in the number of untaxed cars on the road
  • 44% reckoned the change would actually encourage people to break the law

(Source: RAC)

Tax disc changes 'could cost economy £167m per year'

Next month's ending of the need to display a car tax disc could lead to tax evasion costing the economy £167 million a year, according to the RAC.

Motorists will not need to display tax discs from October Credit: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire

It said it feared that the number of tax-dodgers could equal the number who try to avoid paying motor insurance.

RAC chief engineer David Bizley said: "We could be looking at around £167 million of lost revenues to the Treasury, far exceeding the £10 million that will be saved by no longer having to print tax discs and post them to vehicle owners."

From October 1, motorists will no longer need to display a tax disc on their vehicle windscreen. They will still need to pay their vehicle excise duty car tax, with records being monitored electronically.

Report calls to restrict payday loan adverts

Almost three quarters (74%) of parents want payday loan companies to be banned from broadcasting television and radio adverts before the 9pm watershed, according to a new study.

Report calls to restrict payday loan adverts Credit: PA

The research found that over one third (34%) of children find the adverts to be fun, tempting or exciting, and this group were significantly more likely to say they would consider using a payday loan in the future.

The statistics form part of a report by The Children's Society which calls for restrictions on loan advertising to join those already in place to protect children from adverts for gambling, alcohol, tobacco and junk food.

An economic upturn ‘won’t help low paid’

Britain’s return to economic growth does not automatically mean the lowest paid workers will see their salaries rise, the former head of the commission responsible for the minimum wage has said.

Re-establish link between wages and GDP, says former Low Pay chief Credit: PA

Amid speculation that Ed Miliband will use his Labour conference speech to call for a dramatic hike in the minimum wage, Sir George Bain, the former chairman of the Low Pay Commission, said the Government must act to increase salaries to help five million people on low pay.

Writing in the Independent,Sir George said: “(Bank of England Governor) Mark Carney told the TUC conference that, as productivity increases, Britain will finally get a pay rise. Yet history tells us this is not always the case.

"In both Britain and the US the link between the growth of wages and GDP has weakened over the past few decades. In particular, there is a need to ensure that the lowest paid are benefiting as the economy recovers.”

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Energy review 'will provide opportunity to rebuild trust'

A wide-ranging review into the UK's energy market will provide "an opportunity to rebuild trust" between consumers and providers, Energy minister Amber Rudd has said.

I want an energy market that works for consumers first. That is why the Competition and Markets Authority has been asked to undertake the most far-reaching independent inquiry into the market. This will provide an opportunity to rebuild trust in the sector.

– Amber Rudd

Which?: Four in 10 'worried about cost of winter fuel'

A large minority of energy customers are becoming increasingly concerned about the cost of their energy bills as winter looms, with 41% saying they worry about how to heat their home later in the year.

According to a poll from Which? of the 2,106 adults they quizzed:

  • A dwindling number of energy consumers trust their supplier to charge them a fair price, with only 18% saying they trust their supplier.
  • One quarter (26%) said they did not know whether they could afford to heat their home this winter.
  • Only 24% believed that competition between energy companies currently drove down prices for consumers.

One in five customers 'trust' energy companies

Which? launched their fair energy deal after the poll was published. Credit: PA

Only one in five customers trust their energy supplier to charge them a fair price, a consumer watchdog has found.

The Which? poll showed a "shocking" lack of trust in companies like nPower and EDF, as only 18% of consumers trusted their supplier to charge them a fair price for the power they used.

More than half (54%) said they found it difficult to compare costs between companies.

However, one quarter (26%) rated their supplier for charging them a fair price.

Which? called for simpler tariffs alongside a "credible, independent benchmark" or a "price to beat" set by regulator Ofgem in order to restore consumer trust in energy companies.

Watchdog launches campaign for 'fair' energy prices

New Which? research has revealed a shocking lack of trust in energy companies as they launch a new campaign calling for fair energy prices.

Latest research reveals just one in five people trust energy suppliers Credit: PA

The consumer watchdog has launched a campaign calling for "fair " energy prices after the poll found just one in five people trusted suppliers' charging prices.

Which? has called for simpler tariffs alongside a "credible, independent benchmark" or a "price to beat" set by regulator Ofgem against which consumers could compare costs.

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