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'We need to get these driverless cars onto public roads'

Under new measures announced today, fleets of driverless cars are expected to be introduced to the UK roads in "less than six months".

The Government plans to adapt road regulations, which requires changes to the Highway Code, to allow companies to start running trials of cars that do not need a human driver.

ITV News Correspondent Ben Chapman spoke to future transport engineer, Tim Edwards, as he was taken for a drive in one of the new satellite controlled vehicles.

"What we need to do now is get these cars onto public roads so they are immersed in the really complicated day-to-day drive that we'll experience," Mr Edwards said.

Watch: Google shares video of man testing driverless car

Driverless cars will be on UK roads in 'under 6 months'

Business Secretary Vince Cable has announced today that new measures would see "fleets" of driverless cars take to Britain's roads "in less than six months”.

The Business Secretary said driverless cars would be on the roads in
The Business Secretary said driverless cars would be on the roads in Credit: PA

The Government plans to adapt road regulations, which requires changes to the Highway Code, to allow companies to start running trials of cars that do not need a human driver.

Cable said the satellite controlled vehicles are putting the nation "at the forefront of transformational technology" and believes the UK has the "potential to be a world leader in this field".

We will have vehicles which will have automatic parking, we can have automatic breaking which can reduce the risk of tailgating and things of that kind, so these features will gradually be built in.

The key point is that British satellite technology is now pretty advanced, we are now one of the leading countries in the world, and the British car manufacturing industry is very successful.

– Mr Cable

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Google shares video of man testing driverless car

The government will announce new measures today which will see driverless cars on the streets of Britain in 2015.

Google has shared a video of the moment Steve Mahan became one of the first users to test the new self-driving car.

The footage follows Steve as he drives around- without touching the steering wheel.

Google posted the video with the message:

Steve’s outing is more than just a carefully programmed test drive, it’s the realization of a science fiction dream and an opportunity for technology to impact the lives of millions of people.

We hope these experiments unlock new possibilities for our users—even if it's something as simple as picking up tacos

– Google

Google announced the project in 2010 in a bid to make driving "safer, more enjoyable, and more efficient".

Read: Former Stig: Best computer in a car 'is the human'

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Justice minister: No 'unfettered right' to search deletion

Responding to the peers' report, justice minister Simon Hughes said:

The Government wants to protect privacy rights and freedom of speech while taking action to bolster economic growth.

Our greatest challenge is getting that balance right, and we welcome the support of the Lords for our position in negotiating new European data protection legislation.

I agree that it is neither accurate nor helpful to say that the recent judgment of the European Court of Justice has given a right to be forgotten. We need to be clear that the judgment does not give individuals an unfettered right to have their personal data deleted from search engine results.

– Simon Hughes MP

Redacted material criteria 'vague and ambiguous'

In its report, based on evidence from data protection evidence, the Office of the Information Commissioner, justice minister Simon Hughes and Google itself, the Lords committee said that the court's judgment had resulted in material being blocked on the basis of "vague, ambiguous and unhelpful" criteria which did not reflect the current state of information technology.

Peers warned the court against trying to "enforce the impossible".

Committee chairman Baroness Prashar said:

Although this was a short inquiry, it is crystal clear that neither the 1995 Directive, nor the Court of Justice's interpretation of it reflects the incredible advancement in technology that we see today, over 20 years since the directive was drafted. Anyone anywhere in the world now has information at the touch of a button, and that includes detailed personal information about people in all countries of the globe.

– Baroness Prashar

Lords: Right to be forgotten ruling is 'wrong in principle'

European courts ruled that Google must remove certain search results.
European courts ruled that Google must remove certain search results. Credit: PA

The European Court of Justice's demand for internet search engines to respect individuals' "right to be forgotten" is unworkable and unreasonable and should be written out of future EU law, a House of Lords committee has said.

In a new report, the Lords Home Affairs, Health and Education EU Sub-Committee said it was "wrong in principle" to give search engines the power to decide what should or should not be deleted and called on the UK Government to fight to ensure that updated EU regulations do not contain a "right to erasure".

The court ruled in May that links to irrelevant and outdated data should be erased on request from searches within the EU, sparking concerns over censorship of material which is accurate and in the public domain.

Man jailed for carrying stun gun disguised as iPhone

A 21-year-old man who was caught by police with a stun gun disguised as an iPhone has been jailed.

Police were called to Chapel Close, Blackthorne, Bicester, Oxfordshire, amid reports of a man in possession of a stun gun.

The stun gun, left, compared to an Apple iPhone 4.
The stun gun, left, compared to an Apple iPhone 4. Credit: Thames Valley Police

Officers who attended the scene at around 8pm on January 6 found Marcel Cross with the device, which had been made to look like an iPhone 4.

Cross, of Chapel Close, was jailed at Oxford Crown Court on Monday for three years for possession of a Section 5 firearm, Thames Valley Police said.

Marcel Cross was jailed for three years.
Marcel Cross was jailed for three years. Credit: Thames Valley Police
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