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Cameron meets Dutch PM to discuss EU reform

David Cameron said the UK and the Netherlands were "old friends and like-minded allies" as he met with Dutch prime minister Mark Rutte in The Hague.

David Cameron and Mark Rutte Credit: RTV

Among the issues to be discussed will be European reform, the need for flexibility and the need to focus on growth and jobs, Mr Cameron said.

The Hague is the first of four European capitals the Prime Minister is visiting on a whirlwind tour to discuss his plans to renegotiate the terms of the UK's membership of the European Union with key leaders.

Later Mr Cameron will travel to Paris in France where he will meet with President Hollande.

'Substantial' EU reform needed for referendum win

The Government will not win its referendum on Britain's continued membership of the European Union unless there is "substantial" reform in Brussels, Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond has warned.

Philip Hammond Credit: Pa Wire

Speaking to the BBC, Hammond said: "The Prime Minister is very clear in dealing with European counterparts that if we are not able to deliver on these big areas of concern that the British people have, we will not win the referendum when it comes.

"We expect our European Union partners to engage with us in delivering a package that will enable the British people to decide that Britain's future is best delivered inside the European Union.

"We expect that some of our partners will adopt a hard line at the start of the negotiations - that's how negotiation works - but we are very confident that, over the course of the summer and perhaps onwards through the winter, we will be able to negotiate a substantial package of reform which will address the concerns that the British people have."

David Miliband's new warning for Labour Party

David Miliband has previously ruled himself out of the leadership race Credit: PA

David Miliband has warned the Labour Party has been sent "back to the classroom for the second time in five years" after their crushing defeat in the general election.

The former foreign secretary, currently president of the International Rescue Committee, also made comments that will fuel speculation about a return to British politics, boasting about his role in winning previous elections with Labour.

He said: "I was in the back room in the early 1990s when Labour in the UK figured out how to win elections rather than lose them."

In a lecture at the Harvard Kennedy School, Miliband blasted of David Cameron's foreign policy, saying that Britain is now politically "in retreat".

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MPs to debate safety of Trident nuclear submarines

The 16,000 ton Trident-class nuclear submarine Vanguard Credit: PA Wire

The safety of the UK's Trident nuclear weapons is to be discussed in Parliament today, after the SNP secured a debate slot.

The party wants to press UK government on recent claims made by a whistleblower concerning the state of the weapons programme.

Able Seaman William McNeilly, 25, caused a manhunt after he published an 18-page report online containing a series of allegations about nuclear submarines based at Faslane, which he called a "disaster waiting to happen".

Alex Salmond, the party's foreign affairs spokesman, said: "Trident is a key issue for people in Scotland. It is bad enough that Scotland is forced to house these weapons of mass destruction but these alleged breaches of security are deeply worrying - there must be absolutely no complacency."

SNP will make 'positive case' for EU membership

The SNP will make "a positive case" for keeping the UK in the European Union, one of its new MPs has told Parliament.

In his maiden speech to the Commons, Stephen Gethins, MP for North East Fife, also said that his party would try and get as many people voting as possible.

He said: "We want to look at a positive case, even look at some areas where we could be deepening our relationship with our European partners."

He added that "the Scottish referendum provided many lessons", especially "including as many of our citizens as we possibly can in a debate about the future of our respective nations".

Farage: EU referendum question is 'so much fudge'

Nigel Farage has criticised the question Credit: Jeff Moore/Empics

Ukip leader Nigel Farage has criticised the wording of the question that will be asked at the EU referendum.

Because David Cameron "is opting to give the pro-EU side the positive 'Yes'", he said, "suggests strongly that his negotiations are so much fudge".

"He has already decided which way he wants the answer to be given, without a single power repatriated."

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