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Devolution plan 'may be a nightmare for Labour'

David Cameron's decision to devolve voting powers on English issues to English MPs alone could cause a major issue for the Labour Party, reports ITV News Political Editor Tom Bradby.

In the event that Labour wins the next election with a slim majority, it may rely on MPs in Scotland that would then be ineligible to vote on English matters such as a budget.

That may mean major bills such as the Budget could be at risk of failure without cross-party support.

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Farage: PM's constitutional plans 'dangerous'

David Cameron's plans to have English devolution presided over by William Hague and a committee are "dangerous", Nigel Farage has told Good Morning Britain.

The Ukip leader said the Prime Minister was "panicking" by saying, "I'm going to put William Hague in charge of a committee and after a few weeks we're going to find a solution to run in a parallel timetable with more Scottish devolution."

Council chief: 'Devolution genie is out of the bottle'

The head of the Local Government Association, which represents councils in England and Wales, has said "the devolution genie is out of the bottle" following the Scottish referendum.

David Sparks said any new powers that Scotland receives "must be given to local areas in England and Wales", adding: "The appetite for devolution does not stop at the border and the rest of the UK will not be content to settle for the status quo."

The LGA called for an urgent meeting of a Constitutional Convention and called on the Government to set out a timetable for devolution across England, with a pledge for immediate new powers to areas which are ready for them.

The Scottish referendum campaign has shown that public trust in the old ways of central control has been shattered beyond repair. That is why establishing an English Parliament, with MPs still calling the shots, would not represent true devolution.

It is locally elected councils - driving their local economies through devolved taxation and greater control over council tax and business rates - which can satisfy the desire of people in England to have greater say in the places they live and work.

– Local Government Association chairman David Sparks

'Inconceivable' not to address West Lothian question

It is "inconceivable" not to address the West Lothian question, after further devolution has been promised to Scotland, the leader of the house of commons has told Good Morning Britain.

William Hague, who will chair the committee overseeing devolution, said Parliament had to "grip" the question of Scottish MPs voting on issues which affected only England.

Abbott: London and other cities must be empowered

Labour MP Diane Abbott has said plans for an increased devolution in Scotland "must be reflected" in London and other cities across the UK.

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MP: Devolution bill needs to 'cover the whole of UK'

A devolution bill should "cover the whole of the UK" and not just provide more powers for the Scottish government, a leading backbench MP has told Good Morning Britain.

Conservative MP Peter Bone said it was "totally unacceptable" to have Scottish members voting on purely English affairs when English MPs were unable to do the same on matters north of the border.

Farage wants England empowered after Scotland vote

Ukip leader Nigel Farage has said he will write to Scottish MPs to ask them to give up their right to debate or vote on devolved English issues in Westminster.

Mr Farage said the drive for a greater devolution of powers within England has "moved up the agenda" following Scotland's vote to stay within the union.

Nigel Farage said he will write to the 59 Scottish MPs to ask them to commit to ending their involvement in England-only policies. Credit: Danny Lawson/PA Wire

"England has not a voice," he told the BBC.

Mr Farage said English people are "rather tired of paying too much tax and allowing Scottish MPs to vote on English issues".

Ukip has released a list of demands for England, including English-only votes in the UK Parliament, should Scotland be given more powers.

  1. Wales

Welsh Conservative Leader and Welsh Secretary 'open-minded' about the future of Wales

  1. Wales

Plaid Cymru: Britain has 'changed forever' following Scottish referendum vote

Following today’s referendum result in Scotland, Plaid Cymru has said that Britain has changed forever and that business as usual in terms of how the nations are governed is not an option.

The people of Scotland have spoken and it is right to respect their decision. What is clear however is that Britain has changed forever and we cannot go back to business as usual.

It is precisely 17 years to the day that the people of Wales awoke to their new political nationhood following our devolution referendum.

Since then our national journey has been characterised by false dawns and failures of imagination. Wales can no longer be a spectator in its own national journey.

A new process must now begin involving all the nations of the UK to ensure meaningful and significant decentralisation.

– Leanne Wood AM, Leader, Plaid Cymru

Plaid Cymru also say the party remains sceptical about the promises of new powers, but any offers to Scotland must also be offered to Wales.

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