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Scottish Catholic Church 'must address wrongs' over abuse

The Catholic Church in Scotland must address the wrongs of the past, according to an independent review of its handling of abuse allegations.

The commission, led by the Very Rev Andrew McLellan, called for survivors of abuse to be prioritised and said the Church must refresh its safeguarding guidelines.

Mr Mclellan, who was previously a moderator of the Church of Scotland and was once chief inspector of prisons, was tasked with evaluating procedures to protect vulnerable children and adults.

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Rare 500-year-old Bible under the hammer for £35k

One of the first Bibles to be printed in English, dating back almost 500 years, is expected to fetch around £35,000 when it goes under the hammer at auction next month.

The rare William Tyndale translation, printed in 1537 - just 11 years after his first complete English translation - was bought by student during the 1960s for just 25 shillings from a shop in Cambridge.

The rare edition of the Bible will be auctioned off next month Credit: PA

Tyndale himself was arrested in Antwerp and executed by strangulation in 1536, accused of being a heretic. All copies of his book found in Britain were burned.

The Bible will go under the hammer at Sotheby's in London on July 15.

The auctioneers' senior books and manuscripts specialist, Peter Selly, said the anonymous owner had only recently realised the book's true worth.

It's a remarkable thing to see the common tongue being deployed in this way. It opens the Bible up for the first time ... and a lot of these phrases would become embedded in the English language.

It's not just the religious aspect, it's the contribution to the English language. A lot of people have said 'no Tyndale, no Shakespeare'. He transformed and had a great gift for the English language.

– Peter Selly, Sotheby's

Pope creates tribunal to hear child sex abuse failings

Pope Francis has approved a new Vatican department to hear cases of bishops who fail to protect children from paedophile priests.

Pope Francis has created a new Vatican tribunal section to hear cases of bishops who fail to protect children from sexually abusive priests Credit: PA

The unprecedented move marks the biggest step yet the Vatican has taken to hold bishops accountable for covering up, or not preventing, child sex abuse in the Catholic church.

The Vatican said that Francis had approved proposals made by his sexual abuse advisory board. The international commission is made up of clerics and lay people - nine men and eight women - whose role is to help dioceses put in place "best practices" to prevent abuse and work with victims.

Victims' groups have long campaigned for the Vatican to establish clear procedures to make bishops more accountable for abuse in their dioceses, even if they were not directly responsible for it.

While no bishop has ever been forcibly removed for covering up for guilty clergy, in April, Francis accepted the resignation of a US bishop who had been convicted of failing to report a suspected child abuser.

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Christian worker wins unfair dismissal case after 'gay jibe'

A Christian nursery worker who was sacked after airing her views on homosexuality and marriage has won a discrimination claim against her former employer, her legal team has said.

Sarah Mbuyi, 31, was fired by Newpark Childcare in west London, for gross misconduct after telling a lesbian colleague her gay lifestyle was a sin. She claimed the sacking breached European law on religious freedom.

Sarah Mbuyi said she was relieved at the outcome of the tribunal which ruled in her favour. Credit: PA

The tribunal recognised that while the employer was "not anti-Christian" Miss Mbuyi had not been treated fairly.

The Christian Legal Centre, who supported Miss Mbuyi, said it was a "common sense" judgement.

Miss Mbuyi said: "I only ever responded to questions that my colleague asked me and wanted the very best for her. I give glory to God for the decision and say 'well done' to the Christian Legal Centre".

Tiffany Clutterbuck, a director of Newpark Childcare, told The Sunday Times that she was disappointed by the ruling.

Pope Francis encourages reconciliation on Bosnia trip

Pope Francis urged Bosnia's Muslim, Orthodox and Catholic communities to work together. Credit: REUTERS/Stringer

Pope Francis has urged Bosnia's Muslim, Orthodox and Catholic communities to work together for a peaceful future, as he made a one-day visit to the capital Sarajevo.

A general view of the stadium before Pope Francis is celebrating a Holy Mass in Sarajevo. Credit: REUTERS/Stringer

The Pope hopes to encourage reconciliation, following the devastating Balkans war of the 1990s.

Children welcome Pope Francis as he arrives for a one-day visit at the airport in Sarajevo. Credit: REUTERS/Stringer

Pope Francis was speaking at a joint news conference with the Serb chairman of Bosnia's three-member presidency, Mladen Ivanic.

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