There are 61 results for "Mid-Staffordshire NHS Trust"

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Patient charity: Keogh report 'too late'

A patient safety charity said hospitals criticised in Sir Bruce Keogh's NHS review should have been investigated "years ago".

Peter Walsh, chief executive of Action Against Medical Accidents, said:

It is scandalous that patients have lost their lives needlessly or been caused misery due to failings in basic care and the regulatory system that failed to act on warning signals.

The Keogh report has come too late for those patients. The hospitals concerned should have been investigated years ago when high mortality rates were already known about.

In spite of the Mid Staffordshire Inquiry, Ministers are still refusing to accept key recommendations such as minimum staffing levels for wards and regulation of healthcare assistants. We hope this report helps change their minds.

– Peter Walsh, Action Against Medical Accidents

More: The 11 hospital trusts placed in 'special measures'

Former Mid Staffs bosses referred to CPS by council

Former bosses at Mid Staffordshire hospital have been referred to the Crown Prosecution Service by Stafford Borough Council.

This Council instructs the Chief Executive to make formal complaint to the Crown Prosecution Service in that Mr Martin Yeates and Mrs Toni Brisby committed the offence of Misconduct In Public Office by knowingly giving false and misleading evidence to the Council’s Statutory Overview and Scrutiny Committee.

– Stafford Borough Council

Student nurses 'not protected' by whistleblowing laws

Student nurses are not protected if they raise concerns about patient care
Student nurses are not protected if they raise concerns about patient care Credit: ITV News

The Royal College of Nursing is calling on the government to extend whistleblowing legislation to student nurses.

The union claims that the current Public Interest Disclosure Act doesn't cover training nurses who raise concerns about patient care.

The government said it would consider the proposal, as it seeks to implement some of the recommendations made in the public inquiry into the poor standards of care at Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust.

Nurses still 'fear repercussions' over whistleblowing

One of the key recommendations made by the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust public inquiry chair, Robert Francis QC, was that concerns and complaints should be able to be raised "freely without fear".

These responses illustrate that despite the recent attention which has been drawn to the importance of whistle blowing, many nurses are still experiencing a culture of fear and intimidation if they try to speak out.

This is putting patient safety at risk. One of the key lessons from the Francis report was that frontline staff must feel confident that they can raise concerns about patient safety without fear of reprisals.

Nursing staff want to provide excellent care, but sometimes the systems they work in do not allow this. Staff know what is safe for their patients and what is not.

However, they cannot raise concerns if they feel unsure about what their employer's policy is or what the repercussions will be.

– Dr Peter Carter, Chief Executive and General Secretary of the RCN

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Mid Staffs is first Foundation Trust in administration

The Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust has become the first foundation trust in the country to be put into administration.

Special administrators will take over the running of the scandal-hit trust from today.

The Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust has become the first foundation trust in administration Credit: Rui Vieira/PA Wire

The current executive team will report to the trust special administrators, clinician Dr Hugo Mascie-Taylor and Alan Bloom of Ernst and Young, Regulator Monitor said.

Special administrators would be given 45 working days to design a way of providing services to patients in the area "that is sustainable in the long term".

Chief executive 'proud to put patients first'

Our staff continue to provide care for our patients at both Stafford and Cannock Chase hospitals, and are very proud to continue to put patients first.

We would like to reassure local people and GPs that we are continuing to provide all our usual services at both hospitals and patients should turn up as usual for any appointments they have.

We would like to thank our local community for their continued support, which means a great deal to staff.

– Lyn Hill-Tout, chief executive Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust

Hospitals will continue to run as normal

Health regulator Monitor's plan will be subject to a public consultation and services at the hospitals in Stafford and Cannock will continue to run as normal until a final decision is reached.

It is important that people in Mid Staffordshire know that they can still access services as usual at Stafford and Cannock hospitals while the trust special administration process is ongoing.

We have taken this decision to make sure that patients in the Mid Staffordshire area have the services they need in the future.

It is now the role of the trust special administrators to work with the local community to decide the best way of delivering these services.

– David Bennett, chief executive Monitor

First NHS foundation trust to be put into administration

Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust is to become the first foundation trust in the country to be put into administration.

Health regulator Monitor said that it has appointed two trust special administrators to "safeguard the future of health services" currently provided at the trust.

Mid Staffordshire first foundation trust to be put into administration.
Mid Staffordshire first foundation trust to be put into administration. Credit: Rui Vieira/PA Wire

Read more: History of scandals at Mid Staffordshire NHS Trust

A spokeswoman said that clinician Dr Hugo Mascie-Taylor along with Alan Bloom of Ernst and Young will take over the running of the trust tomorrow.

Last year, South London Healthcare NHS Trust became the first ever NHS trust to be put under the care of a special administrator after it started losing around £1.3 million a week.

But Mid Staffordshire is the first foundation trust - a supposed marker of excellence in the health service - to face the same fate.

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