There are 65 results for "Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe "

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Brother of Stephen Lawrence 'would join probe'

The brother of murdered teenager Stephen Lawrence has said he would agree to take part in a probe into police records following a damning report which found that officers spied on his family.

Stephen Lawrence's mother Doreen Lawrence and brother Stuart pictured in 2012. Credit: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe plans to appoint an "independent multi-disciplinary team" to search the force's archives for any available evidence for a public inquiry into undercover policing.

Read: Undercover police inquiry after Lawrence case corruption findings

Speaking to the BBC, Stuart Lawrence said: "I reserve judgment until I hear who he's tried to employ to try to do this job and I wouldn't mind being part of the team myself to ensure the job is done".

Baroness Lawrence demands action on 'devastating' claims

Doreen Lawrence
Doreen Lawrence has called for 'decisive action' after a report found the Metropolitan Police spied on her family Credit: Nick Ansell/PA Wire

The mother of murdered teenager Stephen Lawrence has demanded the Metropolitan police chief take "decisive action" after a damning report found officers had spied on her family.

Baroness Lawrence has urged Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe to co-operate fully with the judicial inquiry ordered by the Home Secretary following the Ellison review's "devastating" revelations, in a letter seen by the BBC.

Read: Undercover police inquiry after Lawrence case corruption findings

A report by barrister Mark Ellison QC published this week found that one of the officers on the original investigation into Stephen's death, detective sergeant John Davidson, may have acted corruptly.

It was claimed that Davidson had admitted having a "corrupt connection" with Clifford Norris, the gangland boss father of David Norris, who was finally convicted of Stephen's murder in 2012.

Hogan-Howe: Vital action is taken on Lawrence claims

The head of the Metropolitan Police said it is vital police take action on the allegations resulting from the Ellison report into Stephen Lawrence's murder investigation.

The report concluded that a "police spy" had been working within the Lawrence family camp and that one of the officers in the original murder investigation may have acted corruptly.

Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe said: "This sort of allegation shocks me, it shocks my colleagues and it clearly shocked the public so it is vital that we take it seriously and do something about it."

Watch: 'Pretty awful' to read Lawrence report, says Met chief

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Met Police chief: 'Pretty awful' to read Lawrence report

Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe has told ITV News that it was "pretty awful" to hear the findings of the report into Stephen Lawrence's murder investigation.

"As a professional police officer and then to see the reaction of Mr and Mrs Lawrence who were clearly distraught by what it had heard having lost their son so many years ago, at any level, human or professional, it is pretty awful to hear that list of terrible events," he said.

The head of the IPCC has apologised to the Lawrence family for the police watchdog's part in prolonging the "family's search for the truth".

Watch: Neville Lawrence sheds tears during May announcement

Howe: Report release was worst day of my career

Metropolitan Police Commissioner Bernard Hogan-Howe has said the publication of yesterday's Ellison Report was one of his "worst days" he has seen as a police officer.

The report concluded that evidence of police corruption had been found in the case of murdered black teenager Stephen Lawrence.

Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe. Credit: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Images

Mr Hoga-Howe told The Evening Standard: "This was a devastating report for the Metropolitan Police and one of the worst days that I have seen as a police officer.

“To see Neville and Doreen Lawrence struggling through their tears was awful. The Met has come to know them well and I have enormous respect for their quiet dignity and powerful determination to see justice, which I share.

“I cannot rewrite history and the events of the past but I do have a responsibility to ensure the trust and the confidence of the people of London in the Met now and in the future. This will need a considered response to meet head-on the concerns that have been expressed in yesterday’s report.”

Met Police says sorry to public for 'Plebgate' Pc

Britain's most senior police officer, speaking after the sentencing of Pc Keith Wallis, said that the officer - who is one year away from retirement - would now be the subject of a misconduct process "as soon as possible".

Pc Wallis's actions have clearly fallen way below the standards that me, my fellow police officers and the public demand.

I expect my officers to serve the public without fear or favour. Where officers break the law they must expect to be held to account and answer for what they have done.

Yesterday I apologised personally to Mr Mitchell that an MPS officer clearly lied about seeing him behaving in a certain manner.

Today, I apologise to the public for Pc Wallis's behaviour.

– Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe

Read: Met Police officer jailed for 12 months over 'Plebgate'

Two officers from the DPG have received final written warnings and a third officer has undergone management action in relation to inappropriate comments, the Met confirmed.

Wallis, along with four other officers from DPG, will be the subject of gross misconduct hearings due to start at the end of the month.

Concern that football fans may clash with Duggan vigil

A police statement warning those who would provoke trouble at a vigil being held by Mark Duggan's family follows concerns that the crowds would clash with football fans going to see Tottenham Hotspur play Crystal Palace, but the match is set to go ahead at 3pm.

Carole Duggan speaks to the media following the conclusion to the inquest. Credit: PA

On Thursday Britain's most senior police officer and Prime Minister David Cameron both urged supporters to remain calm at the vigil.

The commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe, thanked the Duggan family for their public calls for peace.

He said: "A vigil is to commemorate Mark Duggan's death, that's what the vigil is about."It's a terrible tragedy that someone's lost a life in this case, and clearly the family want to register, I believe, their protest about the outcome of the inquest."

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