Leveson Inquiry latest

The former Crimewatch presenter Jacqui Hames has alleged to the Leveson Inquiry into press ethics that the News of the World placed her and her detective chief superintendent husband under surveillance because of the paper's links to murder suspects

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Bryan Adams "shocked and annoyed" at stalker story in The Sun

Singer Bryan Adams said in a written statement he was 'very annoyed' and speculated that the police had leaked the story Credit: Reuters

Rock star Bryan Adams told the Leveson Inquiry he had called the police after being stalked by a woman and her son at his home in Chelsea more than three years ago. He was then dismayed to see the story being reported a few days later in The Sun newspaper. Adams said:

"I was very annoyed that what I saw as a private issue was being reported without my knowledge or consent...I do not believe that there could be any other explanation than the fact that the source must have been someone related to my call to the police."

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Former police officer accuses NOTW of derailing murder investigation

Former police officer Jacqui Hames testified to the Leveson Inquiry this afternoon Credit: APTN

A former police officer has told the Leveson inquiry that she believes people at the News of the World were involved in an attempt to 'derail' a murder investigation.

Jacqui Hames said she believes 'there was some collusion between people at the News of the World and people suspected of committing the murder of Daniel Morgan.'

Her husband Chief Superintendent Dave Cook was a high profile detective on the investigation, he was put under surveillance by the newspaper she says.

When an explanation was sought from the News of the World, she says the then News International boss Rebekah Brooks told Scotland Yard that they had been investigating suspicions that Jacqui Hames was having an affair with her husband, and that the newspaper hadn't realised they were married.

This explanation was described by Jacqui Hames today as 'absolutely pathetic'.

Christopher Jefferies: Police leaked my witness statement

Christopher Jefferies arrives to give evidence at the Leveson inquiry at the Royal Courts of Justice Credit: P.A

Christopher Jefferies, the man wrongly accused of the murder of Joanna Yeates, has told the Leveson Inquiry into press standards that he believes the police gave reporters information from his witness statement, leading to a 'feverish' interest in him.

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Mulcaire had MP details

Police failed to tell Liberal Democrat deputy leader Simon Hughes that Glenn Mulcaire had his address, home phone number, the Leveson Inquiry heard.

Scotland Yard detectives informed Mr Hughes in October 2006 that they had uncovered evidence the private investigator had hacked his mobile phone.

But it was May last year before police shared with Mr Hughes the extent of the information that Mulcaire held about him.

Mr Hughes strongly criticised Scotland Yard's failure to bring charges against anyone else despite evidence that "at least three" other senior News of the World journalists were involved in hacking his phone.

Referring to his original contact with police in 2006, he said: "What they didn't tell me was that Mr Mulcaire not only had that phone number but he had every other phone number, address, and other things.

"They did not tell me that he had, for example, the hotline in the office, which only a few people knew, my private phone number at home, which is private because four years before or something like it I had been a witness in a murder case and had had to have police protection."

He said the investigator's notebooks showed that the News of the World had tried to stand up stories about a man and a woman linked to him "based on a salacious assumption".

"They were trying to establish relationships between me and these people, neither of which were what they would have liked them to have been," he said.

Leveson: Liberal Democrat deputy leader not told PI had information

Police failed to tell Liberal Democrat deputy leader Simon Hughes that private investigator Glenn Mulcaire had his address, home phone number and personal details about his friends, the Leveson Inquiry heard today.

Scotland Yard detectives informed Mr Hughes in October 2006 that they had uncovered evidence Mulcaire had hacked his mobile phone while working for the News of the World.

The officers told him other politicians had also been targeted by the investigator but were not willing to go public and give evidence at a trial. But it was only in May last year police showed Mr Hughes the extent of the information that Mulcaire held about him, the press standards inquiry heard.

Today's witnesses to the Leveson Inquiry

The Leveson Inquiry into press standards resumes this morning .

First up is the Lib Dem deputy leader Simon Hughes, who received £45,000 compensation from the News of the World's publishers for hacking his phone.

He will be followed by the former Metropolitan police detective Jacqui Hames and Christopher Jeffries, who was wrongly accused of Joanna Yeates' murder.

The Guardian journalist Nick Davies, who broke the story of widespread hacking at the News of the World, will also give evidence.

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