Major: Murdoch's EU demand

Sir John Major has told the Leveson Inquiry that Rupert Murdoch privately warned him in 1997 to change his policy on Europe or his papers would not support him. This appears to contradict Mr Murdoch's claim that he had never tried to influence PMs.

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Miliband: Something 'went very wrong'

Labour leader Ed Miliband told the Leveson Inquiry into press standards that something went "very wrong" with the way some journalists dealt with individuals. He said police had "not investigated properly" and politicians had not spoken out.

There is clearly something which has gone very wrong with the way parts of the press dealt with individuals. A failure to get to grips with these issues ... by the press, the police, who did not investigate properly, and I think politicians, who were aware of some of what was going on and did not speak out.

Organisations like News International had huge power and I think politicians were reticent to speak about some of these practices that were exposed. I include myself in that."

Leveson Inquiry hears from Ed Miliband

Labour leader Ed Miliband arrives at the Royal Courts of Justice to attend the Leveson Inquiry. Credit: Press Association

Labour leader Ed Miliband is giving evidence to the Leveson Inquiry into press standards. He was one of the people who called for the inquiry to be established in a last year in the wake of the News of the World phone hacking scandal.

Miliband started his evidence by saying he recognised the important role the media plays in "holding politicians to account."

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Sir John Major: Murdoch asked me to change our European policies

Just before the 1997 election it was suggested to me that I ought to have got closer to the Murdoch press...I invited him to dinner, in February 1997.

(The dinner) would have contained the usual amount of political gossip, then in the dinner, Mr Murdoch said that he really didn't like our European policies and he wished me to change our European policies, and if we didn't, then his papers could not and would not support this Government.

– Sir John Major

The former Prime Minister then told the Leveson Inquiry "there was no question of me changing our policies".

Sir John Major was 'too sensitive' over press coverage

Sir John Major said he was "too sensitive" over press coverage towards him when he was Prime Minister, as he gave evidence at the Leveson Inquiry.

Sir John Major is giving evidence at the Leveson Inquiry. Credit: Leveson Inquiry

The former Prime Minister - who held office from 1990 to 1997 - said his poor relationship with the press was down to his decision not to court them which, he added, would have been "undignified".

Sir John added that the press cannot hold the Government to account if there is too much "chumminess" between them.

Labour leader set to face Leveson

Labour Leader Ed Miliband, Former Prime Minister Sir John Major, and Labour's Deputy Leader Harriet Harman are all expected to give evidence to the Leveson Inquiry on Tuesday.

Labour Leader Ed Miliband is set to give evidence to the Leveson Inquiry Credit: Reuters
Former Prime Minister Sir John Major will appear before the Leveson Inquiry Credit: Reuters
Labour Deputy Leader Harriet Harman will also give evidence to the Leveson Inquiry Credit: Reuters

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CPS now has 12 files to consider after hacking probe

Today's five files bring to12 the number of files relating to Scotland Yard's phone-hacking inquiry that have been sent to prosecutors.

The CPS has launched prosecutions relating to just one of the files so far - including former News International chief executive Rebekah Brooks and her racehorse trainer husband Charlie.

Two other files, one involving Guardian journalist Amelia Hill and one relating to former News of the World chief reporter Neville Thurlbeck, have been dropped.

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