Egypt's new leader sworn in

Mohammed Mursi has been sworn in as Egypt's first democratically elected president at a ceremony in Cairo.The Muslim Brotherhood candidate won Egypt's presidential election with just under 52% of the vote.

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Islamist president says Egypt will keep on course

Egypt's new President Mursi delivers a speech during a ceremony
Egypt's new President Mursi delivers a speech during a ceremony Credit: Reuters

Mohamed Mursi, Egypt's first 'democratically elected' president, told the the nation today he will uphold existing international treaties.

Mursi said: "We carry a message of peace to the world and we carry with it a message of righteousness and justice. And as we have always promised we emphasize Egypt's commitment to international treaties and agreements. We will look after these treaties and agreements."

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Mohammed Mursi to be sworn in as Egypt's President

Mohammed Mursi
Mohammed Mursi will be sworn in as Egypt's President on Saturday Credit: REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghan

Egypt's President-elect Mohamed Mursi will takes his oath on today, a week after his victory in a disputed poll was confirmed.

Mursi is to be sworn in officially at 11 a.m. (0900 GMT) by the constitutional court, rather than by parliament as is usual.

The court dissolved the Islamist-dominated lower house this month in one of several measures intended to entrench military influence over Egypt long after Mursi assumes the presidency.

Egyptians flock to Tahrir Square on eve of inauguration

Thousands of Muslim Brotherhood supporters gathered in Cairo's Tahrir Square to hear Mohamed Morsi speak on the eve of his inauguration as Egypt's first Islamist, civilian president.

Supporters of Egyptian President-elect Mohamed Morsi shout anti-military council slogans at Tahrir square in Cairo
Supporters of Egyptian President-elect Mohamed Morsi shout anti-military council slogans in Tahrir square, Cairo Credit: REUTERS/Amr Dalsh
Crowds in Tahrir square
Crowds in Tahrir Square chanted "Morsi is president of the republic" and waved Egyptian flags Credit: REUTERS/Amr Dalsh

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Cameron congratulates new Egypt president

Prime Minister David Cameron has written to Egypt's new president Mohammed Morsi to congratulate him on his election, Downing Street said today.

Mr Cameron's official spokesman told reporters:

The Prime Minister has written to President Morsi to congratulate him on his election.

We welcome President Morsi's statement that he intends to form an inclusive government that will govern on behalf of all the Egyptian people.

Obama commends campaign of Egyptian runner up

President Obama has called Egypt's General Ahmed Shafiq to commend him on a well-run campaign.

The President encouraged General Shafiq to continue to play a role in Egyptian politics by supporting the democratic process and working to unify the Egyptian people.

The President emphasized his interest in working together with the new Egyptian President and all Egyptian political groups to advance the shared interests between the United States and Egypt.

– WHITE HOUSE STATEMENT

The White House earlier congratulated Mohamed Morsi on his "milestone" victory.

Morsi looking to expand ties with Iran

Egypt's President-elect Mohammed Morsi has said in an interview with Iran's Fars news agency that he is looking to expand ties with Tehran to create a strategic "balance" in the region.

Fars quoted him as saying he was interested in better relations with Tehran.

This will create a balance of pressure in the region, and this is part of my programme.

– Mohammed Morsi

Fars said he was speaking a few hours before the results of the Egyptian election were announced on Sunday.

Tahrir Square celebrates Muslim Brotherhood victory

Supporters of Mohammed Morsi continue to fill Tahrir Square, the birthplace of the uprising that ousted autocratic President Hosni Mubarak.

Heavy security had been deployed around the country in anticipation of possible violence.

This is the first time modern Egypt will be headed by an Islamist and by a freely elected civilian. The country's last four presidents over the past six decades have all came from the ranks of the military.

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