Colorado suspect in court

Prosecutors have outlined their case against James Holmes, the American student charged with shooting a dozen people to death at a screening of a "Batman" film at a cinema in Colorado last July.

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Judge: Sufficient evidence to try James Holmes on 12 counts of murder

James Holmes seen in court shortly after the Colorado shootings. Credit: Reuters

A Colorado judge ordered accused movie theatre gunman James Holmes to stand trial on charges he killed 12 people and wounded dozens more in a shooting rampage at a midnight screening of a Batman movie last summer.

Arapahoe County District Judge William Sylvester ruled that prosecutors had shown probable cause that Holmes committed the crimes and ordered him bound for trial on all counts.

He said Holmes should continue to be held without bail.

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Case outlined in Aurora shooting hearing

James Holmes, 25, faces more than 160 charges Credit: Arapahoe County Sheriff's Office/PA

Prosecutors have outlined their case against the American student charged with shooting a dozen people to death at a cinema in Colorado last July.

The hearing today, in which James Holmes, 25, faces more than 160 charges including first degree murder and attempted murder, will determine whether the case will go to trial.

According to investigators, Holmes was wearing body armour and a gas mask when he opened fire and tossed two gas canisters into the cinema on July 20th.

Twelve people died and 58 were wounded in the cinema which was screening the latest Batman film, The Dark Knight Rises.

Suspect in 'Batman' shooting to return to court in US

Colorado shooting suspect James Eagan Holmes at his first court appearance in July 2012 Credit: REUTERS/RJ Sangosti/Pool

The American student charged with shooting a dozen people to death at a screening of a "Batman" film at a cinema in Colorado last July will return to court today for a preliminary hearing.

James Holmes, 25, faces more than 160 charges including first degree murder and attempted murder.

The purpose of the preliminary hearing, which will last around a week, is for prosecutors to try to convince a judge they have enough evidence to put him on trial.

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