BA worker wins crucifix case

A Christian British Airways worker has won her religious discrimination case at the European Court of Human Rights for not being able to wear a crucifx at work. Three other Christians had their claims rejected by judges in Strasbourg.

Ruling due on test cases involving practicing Christians

Hospital nurse Shirley Chaplin, from Exeter, who also feels she was prevented from wearing a cross visibly around her neck Credit: Ben Birchall/PA Archive
Gary McFarlane, who claims he was sacked for saying that he might not be comfortable in giving sex therapy to homosexual couples Credit: Barry Batchelor/PA Archive
Registrar Lillian Ladele, said she was disciplined for refusing to conduct civil partnership ceremonies for homosexual couples Credit: Johnny Green/PA Archive
Sixty-year-old British Airways employee Nadia Eweida, from London, says she was prevented from wearing a visible cross necklace Credit: Dominic Lipinski/PA Archive

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Judgment expected on test cases in employment law

  • Sixty-year-old British Airways employee Nadia Eweida, from London, says she was prevented from wearing a visible cross necklace
  • Hospital nurse Shirley Chaplin, 57, from Exeter, who also feels she was prevented from wearing a cross visibly around her neck
  • Gary McFarlane, 51, a Bristol marriage counsellor, who claims he was sacked for saying that he might not be comfortable in giving sex therapy to homosexual couples
  • Registrar Lillian Ladele, from London, who said she was disciplined by London's Islington Council for refusing to conduct civil partnership ceremonies for homosexual couples

European Court of Human Rights to give judgment

Nadia Eweida says she was prevented from wearing a visible cross necklace Credit: Dominic Lipinski/PA Archive

The European Court of Human Rights will give judgment today on cases involving four Christians who say they were discriminated against in the workplace.

Sixty-year-old British Airways employee Nadia Eweida, from London, says she was prevented from wearing a visible cross necklace.

It is hoped that success today will lead to an overhaul of the Equality Act and other diversity legislation.

Judgment will take place at 0900 UK time.

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